SEPTEMBER 2021
MONTHLY NEWSLETTER
This is UK author Tim Walker’s monthly book blog. It can include any of the following: author news, book launches, guest author profiles, book reviews, flash fiction and poetry.
Are you an author or a poet? If so, then please contact me for a guest author or poet’s corner slot in a future newsletter: timwalker1666@gmail.com
SOCIAL MEDIA
F A C E B O O K
T W I T T E R
I N S T A G R A M

AUTHOR NEWS…

In my news, Guardians at the Wall continues to sell moderately well since its June launch, attracting a good number of page reads on Kindle Unlimited. 

My first attempt at dual timeline, it tells the story of student archaeologist, Noah Jessop, and his investigation into the life of Roman centurion, Gaius Atticianus. Both stories, although separated by 1,800 years, share the same locations – Vindolanda, Corbridge and Epiacum forts near Hadrian’s Wall.
It will be the subject of a second Kindle Countdown Deal when the e-book will be just 99p/c from 14th to 19th September, the perfect time to download your copy at the link below if you haven’t done so already… enjoy, and please leave a review!
Paperback £7.99/$8.99 or read on Kindle Unlimited:
AMAZON BOOK LINK

This month’s guest author is Dominic Fielder. Tell us about yourself, Dominic…

I’ve held a variety of working posts, some I’ve been good at, and others appalling. Before the world of Marvel and DC became popular, I ran a comic book store and worked for my parents’ family book business (which ran for 61 years and only recently closed). Either side of that, I worked in the Banking and Insurance sector, when such jobs seemed glamourous, but really weren’t, and as a telephone sales and alarm services clerk, which never seemed glamourous but allowed me to meet some interesting characters.

I undertook a History degree and after achieving First class honours had a change of direction in life. For the past ten years, I’ve become a tutor, specialising in Maths and English for students between years 5 and 11 (10 to 16 in old money). During lockdown, I moved my tuition to an on-line delivery whilst training to become a Secondary school Maths teacher. When I’m not doing those things, I try my best to be a reasonable father, and whatever free time is spare from those commitments, I give to writing.  

The King’s Germans series that I’m now working on, is a twenty book and twenty plus year commitment. Fingers crossed, I will stay the course.

Queen of the Citadels (King’s Germans Book 3) blurb

The new series for readers who enjoy Sharpe, Flashman or The Three Musketeers – discover the third book in the King’s Germans series which will take you from 1793 and the war in Flanders, to the Field of Waterloo in 1815.

October 1793: The French border.

Dunkirk was a disaster for the Duke of York’s army. The French, sensing victory before the winter, launch attacks along the length of the border. Menen is captured and the French now hold the whip hand. Nieuport and Ostend are threatened, and Sebastian Krombach finds himself involved in a desperate plan to stop the Black Lions as they spearhead the French advance. Werner Brandt and the men of 2nd Battalion race to Menen to counterattack and rescue Erich von Bomm and the 1st Grenadiers, whilst von Bomm struggles to save himself from his infatuation with a mysterious French vivandière. Meanwhile, dark and brooding, the citadel of Lille dominates the border. The Queen of the Citadels has never been captured by force. The allies must now keep Menen, which guards Flanders, and seize Lille to open the road to Paris. All of this must be done under the watchful eyes of a spy in the Austrian camp. Juliette of Marboré is fighting her own secret war to free Julian Beauvais, languishing in the Conciergerie prison, and waiting for his appointment with the guillotine, as the Terror rages in Paris.

Some of the reactions to the series so far…

The first good series on the wars of the French Revolution that I have read since Alexandre Dumas...” 5*

If you are looking for your next action-packed historical military series, this is it!” 5*

A great series, full of colourful, often unsavoury, characters set in a neglected period of warfare” 5*

BUY LINK

Follow the series on social media: FACEBOOK PAGE TWITTER

Check out books one and two in the series:

BOOK ONE BUY LINK BOOK TWO BUY LINK

International Literacy Day, 8th September 2021

Since 1967, UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation) has celebrated an International Literacy Day around the world to remind the public of the importance of literacy as a matter of dignity and human rights, and to advance the literacy agenda towards a more literate and sustainable society. Despite progress made, literacy challenges persist with at least 773 million young people and adults lacking basic literacy skills today.

I took the opportunity to participate in a literacy promotion project in Zambia from 1995 to 1996 through the British overseas aid organisation, Voluntary Services Overseas (VSO). My role was marketing and book distribution adviser and trainer attached to the Booksellers and Publishers Association of Zambia. I ran workshops for indigenous publishers, organised the annual book fair, and delivered one-to-one consultancy, to help give association members the skills to promote their own school curriculum books and materials and so reduce the reliance on international companies like MacMillan and Oxford University Press. I was one of a team of five volunteers with different aspects of publishing skills and experience. One promotion we worked on together was the publishing and launch of Zambian President, Frederick Chiluba’s book, Democracy: The Challenge of Change at the 1996 Zambia Book Fair.

In February 1995 I took my laptop with me, did what research I could in country, and produced my presentation slides in PowerPoint – something relatively new in Zambia. The only Internet Service Provider at the time was a University of Zambia project called ZAMNET, and their flaky dial-up service only had a one-mile radius from campus! This involved physically going there to dial in to receive and send emails, and to do a bit of internet surfing. Part of my presentation and follow-on consultancy was setting up small publishers with internet accounts and email, and introducing them to information sources for their sales and marketing activities. Ground breaking stuff that was both enjoyable and rewarding.

But the work of the developed world in supporting people in developing country is, and must be, ongoing. Narrowing the divide through information and skills sharing must be the long-term solution to reducing the appeal of widespread economic migration to Europe. The Zambian economy has leapt forward in the new millennium, with a new professional class emerging to work for regional and international companies and organisations, or setting up their own businesses. Education, literacy and access to resources are vital to emerging economies who can become, in time, self-supporting nation states.

International Literacy Day (ILD) 2021 will be celebrated on 8th September under the theme, “Literacy for a human-centred recovery: Narrowing the digital divide”.

The COVID-19 crisis has disrupted the learning of children, young people and adults at an unprecedented scale. It has also magnified the pre-existing inequalities in access to meaningful literacy learning opportunities, disproportionally affecting 773 million non-literate young people and adults. Youth and adult literacy were absent in many initial national response plans, while numerous literacy programmes have been forced to halt their usual modes of operation.

Tim (far right) and his publishing workshop group

Even in the times of global crisis, efforts have been made to find alternative ways to ensure the continuity of learning, including distance learning, often in combination with in-person learning.  Access to literacy learning opportunities, however, has not been evenly distributed. The rapid shift to distance learning also highlighted the persistent digital divide in terms of connectivity, infrastructure, and the ability to engage with technology, as well as disparities in other services such as access to electricity, which has limited learning options.  

The pandemic, however, was a reminder of the critical importance of literacy. Beyond its intrinsic importance as part of the right to education, literacy empowers individuals and improves their lives by expanding their capabilities to choose a kind of life they can value. It is also a driver for sustainable development. Literacy is an integral part of education and lifelong learning premised on humanism as defined by the Sustainable Development Goal 4. Literacy, therefore, is central to a human-centred recovery from the COVID-19 crisis. ILD 2021 will explore how literacy can contribute to building a solid foundation for a human-centred recovery, with a special focus on the interplay of literacy and digital skills required by non-literate youth and adults. It will also explore what makes technology-enabled literacy learning inclusive and meaningful to leave no one behind. By doing so, ILD2021 will be an opportunity to reimagine future literacy teaching and learning, within and beyond the context of the pandemic.