Category Archives: Poems

Book Blog Newsletter – May 2018

MAY 2018

This is the newsletter of UK author Tim Walker. It aims to be monthly and typically includes: book news and offers, guest author profiles, book reviews, flash fiction and poetry.
Readers of this newsletter are invited to volunteer for the guest author slot, submit a book review, flash fiction story (up to 250 words) or poem to timwalker1666@gmail.com for future issues.

AUTHOR NEWS

FIVE STAR REVIEW AWARD FOR UTHER’S DESTINY

Uther’s Destiny, the third book in A Light in the Dark Ages series, has been selling well, briefly visiting the Amazon top 100 in the Historical Fiction and Alt-History categories. The book blog tour has helped raise awareness for the series and has led to some fine five star reviews.
In addition, it was submitted for review to Onestopfiction.com, receiving the five star review award for March. This award badge has been added to the cover of the e-book.

A LIGHT IN THE DARK AGES:
Book one – Abandoned (http://myBook.to/Abandoned)
Book two – Ambrosius: Last of the Romans (http://myBook.to/Ambrosius)
Book three – Uther’s Destiny (http://myBook.to/Uther)

Now I’d like to welcome this month’s guest author – CLAIRE BUSS…


Claire Buss is a science fiction, fantasy & contemporary writer from Southend-on-Sea, Essex. She wanted to be Lois Lane when she grew up but work experience at her local paper was eye-opening. Instead, Claire went on to work in a variety of admin roles for over a decade but never felt quite at home. An avid reader, baker and Pinterest addict Claire won second place in the Barking and Dagenham Pen to Print writing competition in 2015 setting her writing career in motion.

Tell us a bit about your books.
The Gaia Effect is a hopeful dystopian novel and winner of the 2017 Raven Award from Uncaged Books for favourite Scifi/Fantasy novel. Here’s the blurb:
In City 42 Corporation look after you from cradle to grave. They protect you from the radiation outside the wall. They control the food, the water, the technology and most important of all, the continuation of the human race. Kira and Jed Jenkins were lucky enough to win Collection but when their friends start falling pregnant naturally, everything changes. How long has Corporation been lying to them? Is it really toxic outside the wall? As the group comes to terms with the changes in their lives they discover there is a much more powerful and ancient force at work, trying to bridge the gap between man and nature.

I’m currently working on the sequel, The Gaia Project, which I hope to release later this year. I can’t tell you too much at this early editing stage but I can share with you the fantastic cover artwork which is a constant source of motivation.

Tales from Suburbia is a collection of humorous plays, blogs and short stories that I published last year. It’s quite an eclectic mix of writing but it shows off my natural writing style which does lean towards humour. I’m planning a follow-up, Tales from the Seaside, for release this summer which has been great fun to plan.

My most recent novel, The Rose Thief, is a humorous fantasy inspired by my love of Terry Pratchett. I always thought he did such a great job writing stories that had a message but also had a great deal of fun telling you that message. I’ve been a fan for over twenty years so it felt very natural to write something encouraged by his own style. The book started out as a writers workshop exercise which I then went home and added 20k words to. It was left alone until NaNoWriMo 2016 when I added another 30k and then went on to write the rest. characters, I can’t wait to revisit this world again soon. I already have ideas for a couple of novellas but I feel quite sure we haven’t seen the end of Ned Spinks and his band of thief-catchers!

The reviews have been great calling the book a mixture between Douglas Adams and Terry Pratchett which is fantastic. The first chapter is available to read on my website, here is the blurb:
Ned Spinks, Chief Thief-Catcher has a problem. Someone is stealing the Emperor’s roses. But that’s not the worst of it. In his infinite wisdom and grace, the Emperor magically imbued his red rose with love so if it was ever removed from the Imperial Rose Gardens then love will be lost, to everyone, forever. It’s up to Ned and his band of motley catchers to apprehend the thief and save the day. But the thief isn’t exactly who they seem to be, neither is the Emperor. Ned and his team will have to go on a quest defeating vampire mermaids, illusionists, estranged family members and an evil sorcerer in order to win the day. What could possibly go wrong?

Finally, my most recent project is The Blue Serpent & other tales, a collection of flash fiction stories, which is available to download as an ebook, for free, everywhere – including Amazon. Flash fiction is a new genre for me and I love it, I challenge myself weekly with a different theme or prompt and I love seeing how other indie authors respond to the same prompt, the possibilities are endless.

What do you do when you’re not writing?
As a mum to two small people, obviously I enjoy watching Postman Pat and reading Stick Man but what I really enjoy doing is tackling my huge TBR pile as often as I can and spending as much time as possible by the seaside. We moved in September 2017 to the coast and I keep having to remind myself that I’m not on holiday, I actually live by the sea. Obviously I hope for beautiful summer evenings, being inspired and writing at the beach however I feel sure the reality will be somewhat different.

What do you enjoy the most about writing?
I love building worlds and characters and seeing where they’ll take me. I am a complete pantser, I never know what’s going to happen next and when I’m writing a new book I just let the words flow. Usually I write 1000 words a day, I never read back over what I’ve written and I sit down at my laptop and carry on from the previous day. It does make editing a bit of a graft as I’m forever filling in plot holes and back weaving new characters that appear two thirds of the way through the book but I don’t think I could write any other way. I tried thinking about planning and I started to procrastinate before I’d even chosen what colour post-it notes to use so it just doesn’t work for me.

You can join Claire on social media at the follow places:

Like her on Facebook: www.facebook.com/busswriter
Join her Facebook Group: www.facebook.com/groups/BussBookStop
Follow her on Twitter: www.twitter.com/grasshopper2407
Visit her Website: www.cbvisions.weebly.com
Read her Blog: https://www.butidontlikesalad.blogspot.co.uk

Sign up for her newsletter and get The Blue Serpent & other tales for free: https://mailchi.mp/402338620663/claire-buss-newsletter

All her books are available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Claire-Buss/e/B01MSZY649/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1

This month’s guest poet is JANE JAGO…

EVIDENCE OF GRIEF
The evidence of grief
And the motions of sorrow
Some that we learn
And some we just borrow
The solitary figure
Dry eyed by the grave
Whose hurt runs too deep
For convention to brave
Who stands thus erect
Drawing scarcely a breath
Feels the hard scraping pain
Of a love killed by death
Those who say cold
Have not looked in those eyes
It is not just a loved one
But I who have died

©️ Jane Jago 2017

AGAIN TOMORROW
It’s better to have loved and lost
is that not what they say
Who have not loved to count the cost
of one heartbroken day
A day when time and tide are out
a day to stand alone
A time to understand the doubt
the lie in the word home
Naked born and shed we tears
upon the barren earth
Cry, is it better yet to love
no matter what our birth
Should we turn our back on chance
for fear of bitter sorrow
Or open up our hearts and minds
and love again tomorrow

©️ Jane Jago 2017

For more prose and poems from Jane Jago please follow her blog:
Link to blog.  https://workingtitleblogspot.wordpress.com/

Book Blog Newsletter – April 2018

APRIL 2018 NEWSLETTER

This is the newsletter of UK author Tim Walker. It aims to be monthly and typically includes: book news and offers, guest author profiles, book reviews, flash fiction and poetry.
Readers of this newsletter are invited to volunteer for the guest author slot, submit a book review, flash fiction story (up to 250 words) or poem to timwalker1666@gmail.com for future issues.

AUTHOR NEWS

The third and final book in Tim Walker’s A Light in the Dark Ages series, Uther’s Destiny, was published on 9th March. The primary focus of the launch awareness campaign was a book blog tour that involved author interviews, book blurbs, Q&As and links on a dozen well-known blogs, realising over 6,000 views/reads. This has helped support favourable March e-book and paperback sales (and KU page reads) for all three titles in the series. Here’s a list of the blogs…
Mary Anne Yarde Blog – 1st March (Background to Uther)
http://maryanneyarde.blogspot.com
Linda’s Book Bag (Linda Hill) – 2nd March (Blurb, profile)
http://lindasbookbag.wordpress.com
Historical-fiction.com (Arleigh Ordoyne) – 3rd March (In Search of the Elusive Arthur)
http://historical-fiction.com
Books n’ All Promotions (Susan Hampshire) – 6th March (Book review and links)
http://booksfromdusktilldawn.wordpress.com
English Historical Fiction Authors (Debra Brown) – 6th March (In Search of King Arthur)
http://englishhistoryauthors.blogspot.com
EM Swift-Hook & Jane Jago Blog – 9th March (Uther Q&A)
http://workingtitleblogsport.wordpress.com
Grace’s Book Review – 13th March (Book review by hubby John)
http://reviewerbookladygoodnready.wordpress.com 

Jane Risdon – 17th March (Arthurian article)
http://janerisdon.wordpress.com
Elizabeth-gates.com book blog – 22nd March (Author interview)
http://elizabeth-gates.com/blog
Rosie Amber Book Review Blog – 29th March (Arthurian article)
https://rosieamber.wordpress.com/your-book-reviewed/
Mary Anne Yarde Book Blog – 29th March (book review)
http://maryanneyarde.blogspot.com
Jenny Kane Blog – 4th April
http://jennykane.co.uk/blog

Uther’s Destiny is the third book in A Light in the Dark Ages series, and can be read as a standalone (although readers who enjoy it may want to seek out book one – Abandoned (http://myBook.to/Abandoned) – and book two – Ambrosius: Last of the Romans (http://myBook.to/Ambrosius).

Buy the e-book or paperback or read on Kindle Unlimited: UTHER’S DESTINY

 

This month our guest author is British historical author, Elizabeth Gates…

Who is Elizabeth Gates?

Between reading English Language & Literature at Bedford College, University of London, and acquiring an MA in Linguistics at the University of Essex, ELIZABETH GATES explored Europe as a teacher of English and Creative Writing. She then went on to work as a freelance journalist for 25 years, published in national, regional and local magazines and newspapers and specialising in Public Health Issues. These issues ranged  widely including – among many others – stories about suicide among farmers, health & safety on theatrical stage and filmset, bird flu and PTSD in returning service personnel. But eventually, she retired from journalism and turned to fiction.

The Wolf of Dalriada is the first novel in a series and Elizabeth is currently writing a sequel set again in 18th Century Scotland but also in Robespierre’s Paris. Staining the Soul will be published in Autumn 2018. A third novel in the series, focusing even more deeply on the Clearances, is at the planning stage. With more ideas to come. She also writes, publishes and broadcasts short stories and poetry.

When she s not writing, Elizabeth enjoys time with her friends, family and animals. She also loves history and travelling. And she is director of the writing for wellbeing consultancy, Lonely Furrow Company.

The Wolf of Dalriada – the story
‘Gaelic calls spin a web through the mist in arcs of soft sound. Fear unsteadies the unseen flocks on the scrub heather hillside as men and dogs weave a trap around them in the darkling night. Once the flocks are penned, then the lanterns are turned towards the south. The watchers wait in silence.’
The Wolf of Dalriada Chapter One.

It is 1793… As Europe watches the French Revolution’s bloody progress, uneasy Scottish landowners struggle to secure their wealth and power and, in Dalriada – the ancient Kingdom of Scotland, now known as Argyll – fractured truths, torn loyalties and bloody atrocities are rife. Can the Laird of the Craig Lowries – the Wolf of Dalriada – safeguard his people?

At the same time, the sad and beautiful Frenchwoman, Adelaide de Fontenoy – who was staked as a child in Versailles on the turn of a card – is now living in thrall to her debauched captor, the English lawyer, Sir William Robinson. Can the laird Malcolm Craig Lowrie save the woman he loves?

And can the Wolf of Dalriada defeat enemies who, like the spirit of Argyll’ s Corryvreckan Whirlpool, threaten to engulf them all?

Written with a blend of mysticism, intrigue and psychological realism, The Wolf of Dalriada is an historical adventure novel, with a rich cavalcade of characters  – mystic, heroic or comic –progressing through its pages. Inspired by the historical writing of Phillipa Gregory and Hilary Mantel, the novel challenges any pre-conceptions of ‘romance’ and has been described in review as ‘A great read’!

What moments in the novel do you like best?
I love the moment when we first meet Malcolm Craig Lowrie, the Wolf of Dalriada – when he pauses between attacks to allow the enemy to collect their dead. Although he says little, he feels much. And, when we first meet Adelaide de Fontenoy,  questions about her mysterious life crackle in the air above her beautiful head.  I also enjoy the moment when rich, urbane and witty lawyer Sir William Robinson finds himself drawn into dangers he would have avoided, had he known they were coming. The triangle set up by these characters is, of course, the eternal one.

What moments do you like least?
I found the massacre at Ardnackaig difficult to write (although it flowed from the pen). This event illustrates how closely violent death stalks people perched on the edge of subsistence and this is a timeless message. The death of the loyal sheepdog, Bess, is sad enough but then the massacre of shepherds by a rogue war-band follows, and the scene ends devastatingly with the discovery of the hanging of two Craig Lowrie boys. The impact of this on the clan is terrible and the intended message is  ‘No one is safe.’ Everyone then placed their trust in their clan chief, Malcolm Craig Lowrie – a heavy burden for a young man to carry. Small wonder the name ‘Ardnackaig’ became the clan war-cry.

Is there an important theme (or themes) that this story illustrates?
How did women in the 18th Century ‘survive’ when they were so dependent on male patronage and has survival become any easier in the intervening centuries? I also explored the role of men. Their burdens could be almost intolerable, involving conflicts of ‘love’ and ‘duty’. And this begs the questions: Are the values of ‘duty’ and ‘loyalty’ outmoded? And what can replace them to keep society functional?  Of course, society may undergo huge change – such as  the change prompted by the waves of revolutionary thought emanating from 18th Century France – but you still need to survive. In short, you still need lunch.

What is the role of superstition and tradition in this story?
In The Wolf of Dalriada, superstition and tradition underpin the Highland way of life – respect for the ancestors, for example, was a common spiritual bond –  but both superstition and tradition are ruthlessly manipulated by those who wish to control the situation. Even so, whatever the venal believe about their own power, the supernatural glimmers in the Scottish air so you never quite know which world you’re living in. And this story veers between a fairy tale going back to the dawn of time and an18th Century comedy of manners.

What role have the senses – sight, sound, touch, taste, smell -– in the writing of this book?
Phillip Pullman, in his wonderful book, ‘Daemon Voices’, says novels have more in common with film than theatre. I would agree – to a certain extent. ‘Sight’ is the predominant sense involved in the first draft of a novel and in film. You are describing a ‘rolling’ scene so that the reader can ‘see’ it. But theatre and subsequent drafts of a novel, I find, can appeal to the other sense too. As I was writing I found the ‘recall’ of other sensations help me describe a scene, reaching out to shared experiences with readers, helping them to relive the moment. The Scottish landscape is described, using all the senses. Scotland is sensual. And Versailles. And Fashion – which meant so much to the heroine, Adelaide de Fontenoy – also demands blatantly sensual description. So although the sense of sight is very important, the reader uses the other senses too. The author is working with the reader’s capacity to recall.

Which character would you most like to invite to dinner and why?
Sir William Robinson would be my go-to dinner guest. Even if it was in danger of becoming emotionally mired, he would know how to keep the conversation entertaining,. And he – like the Duke of Argyll and Malcolm Craig Lowrie – is a collector of useful information. Because he knows a lot but is also prepared to chat about it, he would be well worth an invitation. The trick would be to encourage him to think that your dinner table is worth opening up sufficiently to gossip.

Where did your research take you? How is research best handled? Historical fiction relies on accurate detail to build up a ‘world’ in which a story can believably take place but, even so, for the reader, the story remains more important than the research. And – even though we may teach through our parables – novelists must not be purely educators. Novelists must remember they are entertainers. As an historical novelist, I love research – people, places, times, customs – but it is better not to dump too much fact in any single scene. You lose your reader.

People say all fiction is autobiographical. Is there a formative experience in your life is the basis for this book?
I suppose this is asking how literature works. Readers can identify with what the author is saying or the characters are experiencing in a story. This encourages a capacity for empathy. Because of their empathic response, readers may also experience catharsis (a release of pent up emotions they struggle with). And readers may – through gaining insights into the problems explored in the story – gain insights into the problems in their own lives. Historical fiction has an extra benefit. It removes the ‘issue’ from the familiar everyday and any new perspective can throw up new insights. One formative experience in my life – which led me to explore the issues in this story – has been a conflict between love, survival and duty. I’m not prepared to say more. But yes, to a degree, The Wolf of Dalriada is autobiographical. I also love Argyll!

Contact and connect with Elizabeth Gates:-
Email:
egates3@gmail.com
Social Media Links:
Author Website:
https://www.elizabeth-gates.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com
FB Pages: https://www.facebook.com/TheWolfofDalriada/
https://www.facebook.com/LizzieGatesasNovelist/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/LizzieGates
Blogger: https://lizziegates.blogspot.co.uk

The Wolf of Dalriada is available to buy from:
Amazon.co.uk :
https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1785899902

Available from all good bookshops and also available to borrow in the UK and Ireland through Public Libraries.

My Vedic Hymn To You

By Michael La Vin

You came to me from Kerala,
Purple and white, your Portuguese
Beauty illuminated me day and night
I wrapped my arms around you, and you grew within my core

I felt your trembling arms reach up,
Caressing my epiphytic roots,
I towered over you as your beauty blossomed.
With each tender caress,
I knew you would be mine forever more.

Rest your sweet head upon my arms,
As Krishna did
So many years, so many eons ago.
He has sent you now,
As a reminder of His power and beauty
As you blossom forever protected within my frame

As you lie within , caressing,
Loving and sharing , My roots ever stronger, strengthening,
As you blossom and flower,
Engorged and radiant,
Your scent transcends, a perfumed heady diaspora
Your sweet nectar flowing, feeding my soul
Your Karma washes over and through me

Intricately entwined,
Enwrapped, entrapped
Infinitely and endlessly interwoven.
Enlightenment achieved,
A oneness, a togetherness,
Rooted in, sharing and growing from the same earth

You came to me,
A material reflection of the spiritual domain,
A shadow of perfected reality,
Slowly unfolding your secrets,
In an intertwined rapturous eternal love
Come amongst us – declared as one of the perfect beings.

Book Blog Newsletter

Issue 1 – February 2018

Welcome to Tim’s Book Blog Newsletter. This will be a monthly newsletter on my website but also doubling as an e-newsletter for my mailing list. Please subscribe to my mail list to ensure you get future issues (fill in the form on the side panel of my home page and get a free short story!). The newsletter will include brief news of my writing and book promotions, feature a guest poem and also guest authors.

News

I shall be launching my next book, Uther’s Destiny, on Thursday 15th March. I intend to use the Amazon pre-order facility for the first time and promote it from the beginning of March as available for pre-order at 99p/99c e-book. 15th March is the official launch date when the e-book will be priced at £1.99/$2.99 and the print-on-demand paperback at £5.99/$6.99.

Uther’s Destiny is the third book in A Light in the Dark Ages series, and can be read as a standalone (although I’m hoping new readers will be motivated to go back to read book one – Abandoned – and book two – Ambrosius: Last of the Romans.

Here’s the cover and book blurb:

Fifth century Britannia is in shock at the murder of charismatic High King, Ambrosius Aurelianus, and looks to his brother and successor, Uther, to continue his work in leading the resistance to barbarian invaders.

Uther is a powerful warrior, proud of his reputation as the slayer of Saxon warlord, Horsa. A pragmatic soldier, he feels he has lived too long in the shadow of his high-principled brother. Uther has brushed aside the claim of his young nephew, Dawid, and is endorsed by quarreling Briton tribal chiefs, who know he is the best man to challenge the creeping colonisation of the island by ruthless Saxons.

Uther’s destiny as a warrior king seems set until his world is turned on its head when his burning desire to possess the beautiful Ygerne leads to conflict. Could the fate of his kingdom hang in the balance as a consequence?

The court healer, and schemer, Merlyn, sees an opportunity in Uther’s lustful obsession to fulfill the prophetic visions that guide him. He is encouraged on his mission by druids who align their desire for a return to ancient ways with his urge to protect the one destined to save the Britons from foreign invaders and lead them to a time of peace and prosperity. Merlyn must use his wisdom and guile to thwart the machinations of an enemy intent on foiling his plans.

Meanwhile, Saxon chiefs Octa and Ælla have their own plans for seizing the island of Britannia and forging a new colony of Germanic tribes. Can Uther rise above his domestic problems and raise an army to oppose them?

Uther’s Destiny is an historical fiction novel set in the Fifth century, a time known as the Dark Ages – a time of myths and legends that builds to the greatest legend of all – King Arthur and his knights.

 

Our guest authors this month are two talented historical and fantasy fiction authors, E.M. Swift-Hook and Jane Jago, whose ‘Dai and Julia’ stories I have enjoyed immensely…

The Dai and Julia Mysteries are set in a modern day Britain where the Roman Empire never left. Crime is rife. Murder, trafficking, drug smuggling and strange religious cults are just a few of the problems that investigators Dai and Julia have to handle, whilst managing family, friendship and domestic crises. The Dai and Julia Mysteries are available as separate novellas or in an omnibus with bonus short stories.
Co-Authors:
E.M. Swift-Hook – author.to/EMSH
In the words that Robert Heinlein put so evocatively into the mouth of Lazarus Long: ‘Writing is not necessarily something to be ashamed of, but do it in private and wash your hands afterwards.’ Having tried a number of different careers, before settling in the North-East of England with family, three dogs, cats and a small flock of rescued chickens, E.M. Swift-Hook now spends a lot of time in private and has very clean hands.

Jane Jago – author.to/JaneJago

Jane Jago lives in the beautiful west country with her big, silly dog and her big sensible husband. She spent the first half of her working life cooking and the second half editing other people’s manuscripts.
At last, she has time to write down the stories that have been disturbing her sleep for as long as she can remember.
Links:
Amazon – Novellas mybook.to/DnJ
Amazon – Omnibus mybook.to/DnJOne
This will be a guest poet’s slot (any offers?), but to get the ball rolling here’s one of mine – a thinly disguised, uncultured homage to the great Irish poet, WB Yeats…

The Enchanted Isle

By Tim Walker

I shall arise and go to the enchanted Isle,

Where my mind shall be soothed in quiet reflection,

Through the still waters of the lake, a mirror of the soul;

Ripples spread like pages from my life,

The warmth of the sun on my upturned face,

The freshness of the breeze upon this placid place;

Oarlocks groan to the steady rhythm of endeavour,

As my guide’s instincts deliver us safe,

We alight and tread the little-worn path,

Passing wildfowl and frogs, birds and bees,

Gnarled oaks randomly bend as thick grass encroaches,

On a procession through nature to the sacred stone.

Its weathered grey face leans at an uneasy angle,

Protruding from the earth where the ancients placed it,

The inscriptions in a long forgotten hand speak no more

Of the lives and beliefs of those who have passed;

But their spirits live on in the wind and the rain,

An indelible part of this patchwork landscape,

Without colour or cares, a slight moan of regret,

That their brief lives passed in a blink of an eye,

Through seasons’ change, what withers must die,

But soon replaced by a similar life,

That commits to the struggle to grow and survive,

On this earth where beauty elicits a smile,

And we strive to succeed for a very short while.