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Book Blog Newsletter – March 2018

This is the newsletter of UK author Tim Walker. It aims to be monthly and typically includes: book news and offers, guest author profiles, book reviews, flash fiction and poetry.
Readers of this newsletter are invited to volunteer for the guest author slot, submit a book review, flash fiction story (up to 250 words) or poem to for future issues.


The third and final book in Tim Walker’s A Light in the Dark Ages series, Uther’s Destiny, is set to launch on 9th March. This novel completes the series he began writing in July 2015 with the novella, Abandoned!, inspired by a visit to the site of former Roman town, Calleva Atrebatum (Silchester in Hampshire). It was Tim’s intention with this series to create an ‘alternative history’ of life in Britannia in the Fifth Century. This is the time immediately after the Roman occupation ended (in 410 AD) and his narrative incorporates elements of the Arthurian legend, as described by Geoffrey of Monmouth in his History of the Kings of Britain, published in 1136.

Uther’s Destiny is the third book in A Light in the Dark Ages series, and can be read as a standalone (although readers who enjoy it may want to seek out book one – Abandoned ( – and book two – Ambrosius: Last of the Romans (

UTHER’S DESTINY – Pre-order now!

Fifth century Britannia is in shock at the murder of charismatic High King, Ambrosius Aurelianus, and looks to his brother and successor, Uther, to continue his work in leading the resistance to barbarian invaders.

Uther’s destiny as a warrior king seems set until his world is turned on its head when his burning desire to possess the beautiful Ygerne leads to conflict. Could the fate of his kingdom hang in the balance as a consequence?

The court healer, and schemer, Merlyn, sees an opportunity in Uther’s lustful obsession to fulfil the prophetic visions that guide him. He is encouraged on his mission by druids who align their desire for a return to ancient ways with his urge to protect the one destined to save the Britons from foreign invaders and lead them to a time of peace and prosperity. Merlyn must use his wisdom and guile to thwart the machinations of an enemy intent on foiling his plans.

Uther’s Destiny is an historical fiction novel set in the Fifth century, a time known as the Dark Ages – a time of myths and legends that builds to the greatest legend of all – King Arthur and his knights.

This month we welcome British dystopian novelist, Stuart Kenyon.  Stuart prefers to write in public places, tapping away as the world passes by, and he plots his stories whilst out walking the dog. He has always enjoyed reading disturbing tales which explore the darkness at the heart of the human condition, and his characters are devised with this in mind.

As the father of a severely autistic son, the author has pledged to donate a fifth of all royalties from the SUBNORMAL series to his local Special Educational Needs school. They are raising money to provide much-needed sensory equipment for the children. The treatment of disabled people in Britain – in particular the cuts in welfare benefits for society’s most vulnerable – provided Stuart with the inspiration for his original trilogy. The Brexit vote, and the lurch to the right in politics across the Western World, prompted him to write SWIFTLY SHARPENS THE FANG.

Stuart lives in Greater Manchester, England with his wife and two young children. Despite wanting to pen a novel since reading English Literature at the University of Salford, he didn’t start writing until 2014. He released the final part of the SUBNORMAL series in May 2016, and has recently written a new novel, SWIFTLY SHARPENS THE FANG, which released 30th January 2017. Currently, he is writing a post-apocalyptic science fiction series, which should be finished by the end of 2018.

@StuartKenyon81 (Twitter)
Stuart Kenyon – Author of Dystopian Novels (Facebook) (website)
Book Links: (Subnormal) (Supernormal) (Postnormal) (Swiftly Sharpens the Fang)

David Bowie: Star Man

A personal reminiscence by Linnet Lane
1973.  Enter David Bowie, my first musical idol…

Not a hand-me-down crush.
Not copy-cat crooner nor harmonising hoofer.
Boys and girls, we all wanted to BE Bowie, not to bed Bowie.  Or so we said.
In a suffocation of affiliates – stick with, stick to, stick in the bubble -gum bovver boys and soul sisters –   Bowie stuck out.
He struck out, struck up, struck US, and lightning-struck Ziggy Stardust.
Bowie’s cosmic visionary, ungendered by grease paint, whined in the key of light,
Crashing and lapping like a lover on the shore of our sensibilities.
We Major Tommed and Jean Genied all our sixteenth summer long,
Took the songs to our hearts and the genius for granted.
John, I’m Only Dancing.
Dancing out loud in dazzling colours.

Yesterday a grey locked, death locked, grave garbed image
Shared the only vision the rest of us ever had, one of parting.
Didn’t rage against the dying of the light, but bent its last rays to a spot for his thorn-bird song,
Effortlessly in tune at last.

Major Tim, floating in his ’tin can’, twixt a new earth and a new heaven, mourns.
His life trailed by art.
The tide is far out. And the stars look very different tonight.

By Linnet

It’s customary to list partners, offspring and pets as a breastplate against literary rejection…  I live with a supportive collection of houseplants in a nineteen-sixties semi within a Yorkshire village that tries hard. The pen name Linnet (the storyteller in Lucy M Boston’s ‘Children of Green Knowe’) wakes my imagination.  I wrote my first complete story in 2014, forty years after study got in the way of writing for its own sake, and have begun to build a collection.
This poem is a one-off.




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