All posts by timwalker1666

Newsletter – March 2019

Author News

Well, after nine months of research, plotting, writing and hand-wringing, the fourth book in my A Light in the Dark Ages series, Arthur Dux Bellorum, is finally good to go. I’ve formatted it for e-book (on a variety of platforms) and paperback. I love the cover, and feel the Fates (as the Romans would have it) smiled on me the day I saw Gordon Napier’s stunning picture, entitled ‘Arthur Dux Bellorum’ on deviantart.com.

My cover designer, Cathy Walker, added her magic and the end result is a cover I can be proud of. We decided to let the whole picture cover the page, and not block-out the bottom to conform with the previous covers in the series.

Rather than bore you with self- praise (lol), I decided to throw the gauntlet to my keen proof reader and critic partner, Linda Oliver, to tell it from her perspective. She has been on board since book one, and quite honestly, I would have given up, racked by self-doubt, a long time ago if it wasn’t for her support and emailed kicks-up-the-backside. Writing can be a lonely business…

My buy links are: Paperback

Amazon Kindle Universal

Apple i-book, Kobo, Nook, other

First, catch your… writer – by Linda Oliver

I caught my writer on an online fiction forum. Tim had set out his idea to write a series of novels about how life changed for fifth century Britons after the Romans left. It would end with King Arthur’s death, about a hundred years later.  I did a double take.  I’m still sulking because I lent my childhood copy of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table twenty years ago, and never saw it again, so the topic appealed to me. Also, I was charmed by the epic scale of the Boy’s Own Adventure project. But I thought a novice fiction writer would get lost in it. Tim Walker’s a nice nom de plume, I thought, wordplay on the literary time travel he’s embarked on. I was wrong about that too.

 Tim had posted an extract from the first incarnation of ‘Abandoned’, with a request for feedback. I read, admiring the pleasing balance between narrative and dialogue, the clear point of view and the vivid settings, and then I forgot I was reading for a purpose and my imagination took over. I enjoyed the idea of Marcus Aquilius, a young character whose father had been a Roman soldier and whose mother was a Briton, a sorceress in the eyes of some. I could see him torn. Should he view the departure of a Roman legion as an opportunity to advance himself, or a cause for dismay? When his mother gave him a tunic on which she’d stitched her own design, he was touched, but took it off so that his men wouldn’t see him in it, which reminded me of me, taking off my knitted bonnet with its chin strap at my gate. Not in recent times, obviously.

Linda Oliver lives in a beautiful corner of Britain – the Yorkshire Dales

 When I finished reading, I was smiling, but I realised I’d noted a few pointers and had a strong urge to look up the number of people living in Britannia at this time. I’ve always had a weakness for seeking demographic insight. So there I was, shimmying down into the role of invited busybody. This writer deserved praise because the story set out clearly, in a varied manner, what was happening in the wider Roman Empire, in the town and in the family of Marcus Aquilius. Its complexity opened out gradually. And then the characters sprang into action. So I told him all this.

But there were questions. Once I’d become a regular sounding board for Tim, we discussed issues related to style. Would the screenplay style in the early version of ‘Abandoned’ be suitable and sustainable for a series? That’s a lot of externalising, heavy going for writer and reader. And how should the dialogue sound? I accepted the characters are statesmen and scholars, as well as soldiers, in this version of the past. They need to articulate developed ideas, despite the likelihood of them swinging a sword through their enemy before the end of the same chapter. And who is it for? Adult and young adult readers?

 As the series has progressed, every novel has taken on a slightly different style, and the military leaders focus on different regions of Britannia. The protagonists also bring contrasting back stories and personal qualities. The second book in the saga, Ambrosius, is about a character with a vision for his homeland, one who chooses to pursue it, whereas the other leaders have responsibilities thrust upon them. They are all the standout individuals of their generation. They’re not cosy,  spending their lives wearing a groove in The Devil’s Highway and Ermine Street, driven to drag hesitant lads to confront foreign raiders, or usurpers in their midst. They are the characters making hard decisions when there is a plague to be contained, or taxes must be raised to feed an army.       

The novels reflect Tim’s knowledge and interest, and his ability to bake the chewy plots that keep me reading. The latest instalment,’ Arthur, Dux Bellorum’, out now, is no exception. Readers of Uther’s Destiny will find the story unexpected from the start, and Merlyn and Artorius continually find the challenges ahead throw up unpredicted twists. The noise and energy of armed conflicts drive the adventure, and one of the features of a novel with such an array of characters is that we reader knows they won’t all make it to the next instalment of the saga, no matter how familiar they may be. So that keeps up the tension for me.

 I can’t guarantee I haven’t noticed that a gas poker has been introduced in a roundhouse, or a woman married off to her uncle, but I think I’ve raised all the issues I felt a need to raise. In fact, that’s why I’m in this newsletter. When our esteemed author tapped out a fate worse than death for a character in one of those last minute strokes I’ve learned to expect from him just before a book’s launch date, I set out a reasoned argument why they should be spared, based on continuity, gender power in the novel (I know), and demands of the plot. So, out of gratitude for clemency being shown to an imaginary woman, I’m showing myself ‘front of house’.

 Yes, I’ve loved helping on this project, and the more time and thought I’ve committed to it, the more I feel invested in the series. It’s an accessible interpretation of history, a possible version of a mysterious era of great fluidity, and I found it an informative as well as an entertaining read. My greatest wish was that the eponymous hero should get out of the novel alive… now, that would be telling.

Welcome to Poet’s Corner – Mary Parris

I grew up in Slough, Buckinghamshire, with a shillelagh in one hand and a pen or paint brush in the other. From an early age I started writing little ditties and creating odd paintings. I was lucky to have travelled extensively and lived for a while in California and various other places. However, family ties brought me back to Slough which had then moved to Berkshire!!

I enjoy trying new things (as long as they are legal!) be it Morris dancing, Salsa, Tai Chi. You name it, I’ll try it.  I sang with a West Indian Steel band for a number of years, studied various art forms including Zentangle, Batik, acting, folk art, and poetry which I enjoy the most.

Whatever pops in my mind hits the paper. Silly, sad, romantic, strange, wherever my mood takes it. My paintings and writing have been described as ‘quirky’. I am happy with that. I like the idea that I can dance to the beat of my own drum….

DO NOT SEE ME…

walk as not to know me.

shush. do not see me.

do not glimpse

or make our eyes meet.

I am a whisper of life

dancing on tip toe,

leaving no footprints

to catch me.

I move stealthily, glide so i do not

tremble the waters,

stir the heavens, tempt the devil.

I feel I cannot breathe

trying to control

spirit that emanates from me.

trying to stay hidden.

I am a whisper of life.

dancing on tip toe.

leaving no footprints

to catch me.

if there is a god,

I do not want to wake it.

if there is a Satan

I do not want to tease it.

ignore me. leave me be.

I can carry no more.

I am forsaken from joy.

what sins are upon me

that I fear each new day

will strike a deeper blow

within my heart

that already bleeds its love.

if there is a god,

why is he not kind to me?

cradling my soul.

or is it that he has twinned with

the fallen angel

to torment me.

generous with his maladies,

touching those I love

with his demon fingers.

my thoughts cry,

my tears cry. my heart cries,

my pain, my soul, my life cries.

enough, enough, you bastards.

you have forsaken me.

I will forsake you.

you have burned me enough.

I will believe in no one

but myself.

I will pray to no one

but myself.

I will defy you.

we will defy you.

you do not see me.

I will not see you.

I am a whisper of life

dancing on tip toe,

leaving no footprints

to catch me.

Mary Parris – 26.9.17

THE MODEL

Did I say I’m a model?

I love to preen and pout

and if the money’s generous

I’ll get my tutu out.

I don’t ‘ave o levels

not even an A you see

but I can boast a prefect’s badge

and an amazing double D.

I’ve modelled for the camera club,

was a pin up in 2008,

I did topless for the paper sun

but me photo did not rate.

I was queen of the night in Benidorm,

did some shoots in Wigan town,

then me tan got overloaded

and I went an orange brown.

Me face is quite unique

they say, and me hair’s like

golden honey,

and though I get a little bored

I just think of the money.

I look good in my pink tutu

with my curvy figure eight,

tho not in me fleshy tights

as I’m a little overweight.

and tho I am a model

I am brainy as well.

I do walk ons at dart shows

and pose in bikini’s in Bracknell.

I’ve got a big show Sunday

the best I’ve had so far.

I’ll be sitting on a mini

in Slough’s Herschal Bar.

me mum is excited

tho me dad thinks it’s funny

but I like being a model

cos I like the easy money.

Mary Parris – 30.1.2018

NEXT!

Next time I see you, I will come to your table and say hello.

That’s if my shy, nervous heart will let me.

Or maybe I should just stay in the background, worship you from afar.

But next time you may not be alone and my chance shall be lost.

I imagine you are one of those ‘new men’ all metric, meditation

and mindfulness, whilst I am more of a pound, shilling and pence

kind of girl and next to modern models of makeup, botox and buttocks,

I’m more your Betty Rubble than Betty Boop,

Your Bette Davis than Bette Milder. 

Ah, but next time you may pass me by like you did yesterday,

deep in conversation with your phone. 

I stepped aside for you, heart pounding with hope, expectation.

I think you nodded but you really did not see me.

You have never really seen me.

All my smiles and polite conversation lost in the wilderness of translation,

if there ever was any.

Maybe I’ll just stay in the shadows, me and my aching heart

and forget about this enchantment and yearning for you.

And so, what next?

Next time, hopefully the thrill of you will have eased, softened, ebbed away. Maybe.

…Maybe next time!

Mary Parris – 6.8.18

CHAT FROM THE CAT

Tis I, Cat,

and yes, I saw you sneak in

lifting your heavy foot over me

to climb the stairs in silence.

Your other half sleeping fitfully

unaware of your bawdiness

and debauchery.

Plus, you forgot to feed me today.

Me your ginger mog star

who keeps the mice at bay.

And I don’t like those crunchy morsels

with soft centres.

But did you ask? No.

Your piece of haddock

smelled much more interesting

though you did not have to shout

when I licked it…

But this tom foolery will have to stop.

Waking me in the midnight hour

reeking of who knows what.

Even I have stopped mooching about

for a piece of the action.

All that noisy meowing and yodelling.

And you should know better.

What would the neighbours say?

What would your kids say?

And your other half?

Probably dreaming of the two of you

running hand in hand

somewhere exotic

like Bognor…

And me ow do you think I feel

when you whisper your doings

whilst stroking my tail,

thinking I’m cat napping?

I might be a cat

but I’m not catatonic.

I hear ya, I see ya, I smell ya.

And at your age.

All that beer and belching,

foul talk and farting.

Keep that up and I may move

to the Murphy’s at no 5.

But if you feed me whiskers

or fish I’ll stay.

But stop acting like you’re a tom cat.

You’re a shemale

with your hemale tucked up

cozy snoring the night away.

Go join him.

And if you do go to Bognor

I’d like some fresh eel.

Oh, and by the way,

I finished your haddock.

G’night…   Cat…

Mary Parris – 2019 �=

Newsletter – February 2019

FEBRUARY 2019

I’ve Finished My Book! – What Next?

These are the things I’ve learned over the past three years through self-publishing my books. Once you’ve finished your book, checked and proof-read it and sent it off for a copyedit (yes, you should!). Then sit back, exhale, and take a moment to think about the next step – how to market, promote and sell your book.

My budget is extremely slim (contact me privately and I might tell you) – my biggest cost is on a thorough copyedit. I also invest in a good book cover (e-book and paperback). But to get maximum value from the copyedit, it is advisable to first have your manuscript read and critiqued by one or two trusted friends or beta readers. Get it as good as you can before engaging the services of a professional copyeditor. They will tidy it up and have a care for the overall smooth flow of your story.

As a matter of priority, get your book cover done and write a blurb for your book.

If you’re an indie author and intend to self-publish your book, you need the following things in place in the build-up to your launch date:

  1. A completed, proofed and edited manuscript. You may also have sent your m/s to trusted beta readers who can give you critical feedback. You can tweak your m/s up to about five days before your launch date – then you MUST load up the final version to KDP/D2D or other self-publishing platforms. Always best to launch with the final version!
  2. A list of willing fans/book reviewers to send your advanced reader copy (ARC) and hopefully get you started with some supportive reviews. The main platforms for reviews are Amazon and Goodreads. If you are a reader, you can link your Goodreads account to your Amazon account so that whenever you review an e-book on Amazon, the review is automatically replicated on Goodreads. If you read a paperback copy, then you might have to post a customer review on Amazon and then manually copy and paste your review to Goodreads. Also, Amazon (annoyingly) only publish reviews in the territory in which it was placed. So, if you are a British reader, like myself, operating in amazon.co.uk, then my book reviews will only be seen in my territory and not in other important territories like USA, Canada, EU countries, Australia, etc. You may want to politely ask reviewers to copy reviews to .com, although I understand Amazon are now making this difficult.
  3. A Book Cover. By all means have a go yourself – I dabbled with using cheap-and-cheerful designers through http://fiverr.com and making covers on the cheap, but ultimately remained dissatisfied with the outcome. I soon discovered the value of having a professional book cover designer to discuss my cover ideas with and then hand over to them to work their magic – sizes for your e-book and paperback (wraparound) are precise details best left to an expert. Also, your designer can choose a perfect font for your book – which becomes all the more important if you are developing a series (see my A Light in the Dark Ages series covers with consistent look and fonts – thanks Cathy Walker!).
  4. Get your ASIN (Amazon book number) as early as possible. It’s advisable to load your manuscript to Amazon using the Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) http://kdp.amazon.com platform at least three weeks before your intended launch date. You can use their pre-order function and have your e-book available to pre-order before your launch date. This will, Hopefully, give you a sales spike on your launch day and also provides a platform for early book advertising and promotion. The important thing about using the pre-order function is that you MUST load up your final manuscript FIVE DAYS before your launch date (if you have made any last-minute changes). This gives you an ASIN (book sales link) that you will need to include in your guest blog posts and pre-arranged advertisements.
  5. Also, with your ASIN you can then get a universal link. This is a customised link, often with a short version of your book title, that takes readers to the Amazon or other online retailer sales page for your book wherever they are in the world. It makes it easier for readers to buy your book!

The two I use are booklinker.net (http://mybook.to/Abandoned) and books2read.com (http://books2read.com/Abandoned) Why do I have two? Well, I’ve been using booklinker for three years for just my Amazon-listed titles. In 2018 I joined http://draft2digital.com (who use books2read for their links) to make my e-books available on other platforms including, Apple i-books (i-tunes); Kobo; Nook and others.

  • Format the paperback. Yes, if you’re doing it yourself, you need to use the platforms in KDP and/or draft2digital to load up your MS Word manuscript. You must re-format your e-book m/s and change the page size (eg. 5” x 8”) and include things like a numbered contents page, header, page numbers (footer) in a newly saved Word document. Very fiddly the first time you do it, but thereafter you have created your own template. Tip: get a ruler and measure the ideal page size you want in cms from your paperbacks. KDP offers your two standard book sizes. You will need to read up on setting margins, gutters and bleads. I think your book cover needs to be in print-ready PDF format for KDP, and the spine width is calculated on the number of pages – information you need to give to your book designer once you have it.
  • Consider booking paid-for advertising. In some platforms, like Twitter and Facebook page boosts, you can define your target audience by relevant demographics and interests. Try BooksGoSocial and BookBub for ads aimed at active book readers.
  • Free promotion. Since the launch of Uther’s Destiny in March 2018, I’ve been organising my own book blog tours. This involves identifying relevant book bloggers who review and/or promote independent authors, approaching them and asking for a guest author slot. There are some very supportive book reviewers out there who will be happy to fit you into their schedules, but beware, most take bookings between 6-9 months in advance. So, for my forthcoming book, Arthur Dux Bellorum, due for a 1st March 2019 launch, I’ve been booking guest blog slots since September last year. The other way to promote for free is through your own social media – facebook, twitter, Instagram, pinterest, Google+, LinkedIn; and your newsletter or blog if you have one. I have a monthly newsletter and my following has slowly crept up to over 60 emails (not much, but it’s a start!). If you are reading this on my blog and haven’t yet signed-up, please follow this link and get a FREE short story download! (incentivising people to sign-up is recommended) – http://eepurl.com/diqexz
  • Write your book blurb. I approach this by reading book descriptions of other, similar books in my genre and getting a feel for how author’s entice readers to choose their book. It helps if you’re an international bestselling author (which I’m not… yet) – these tend to lead with ‘BESTSELLING INTERNATIONAL AUTHOR OF…..’ and then a punchy opening line to make you salivate. Others lead with a review quote from a notable source. I’ve just read an article that advises authors to marshal their thoughts by writing a brief summary description using the following formula – A (adjective) CHARACTER NAME + Intrigue.

So, mine might be, “A determined Arthur must learn quickly if he is to survive in Dark Ages Britain.”  This could become your first line/headline, or a guide for your thoughts.

Make it easy to digest for skimmers – short, punchy sentences using power words to heighten emotions. Don’t summarise your book’s plot. It is meant to be a teaser that piques the skimmer’s interest. Its aim is to get those undecided readers to click YOUR buy button.

Here is my first attempt – please give critical feedback!

Arthur Dux Bellorum by Tim Walker

From the ruins of post-Roman Britain, a warrior and charismatic leader arises to unite a divided land.

King Uther is dead, and his daughter, Morgana, seizes the crown for her infant son, Mordred. Merlyn’s attempt to present a youthful Arthur as the true son and heir of Uther is scorned, and the bewildered teenager finds himself in prison. Here, our story begins…

Arthur finds he has friends and together they flee northwards, moving through a fractured landscape of tribal conflict and suspicion, staying one step ahead of their pursuers whilst keeping an eye on Angle and Saxon invaders who spill onto the shores of the troubled island. Arthur gathers supporters as he battles his way to a temporary haven at the great Roman wall. He gradually refines his image with help from his family and followers, learning the harsh lessons needed to survive and acquire the skills of leadership.

Tim Walker’s Arthur Dux Bellorum is a masterly retelling of the Arthurian legend, combining myth, history and gripping battle scenes.

Fans of Bernard Cornwell, Conn Iggulden and Mathew Harffy will enjoy Walker’s A Light in the Dark Ages series and its newest addition – Arthur Dux Bellorum.

  1. Make your own social media adverts using http://canva.com

Canva makes it easy by having the differing standard size templates for your social media posts, covering Facebook story, timeline or page posts; Instagram; twitter; pinterest and others. The three key elements of your adverts are: background, book cover, headline. I tend to place a clickable link in the body of the social media post. Here’s an example of a teaser ad in Instagram size for Author Dux Bellorum:

  1. Plan your Launch Day. Some author’s have Facebook parties, with competitions, free books or other giveaways, inviting friends to join them and post. This can help raise awareness for your book launch. Some authors have a price drop or even a limited time free e-book on launch to generate reads and reviews. Email your friends – make sure everybody knows! Aim to appear as a guest on important blogs and post in your Facebook groups. If you can afford it, plan some advertisements too.

Newsletter – January 2019

AUTHOR NEWS…

A very happy and fulfilling new year to you all! I’m currently writing the fourth book in A LIGHT IN THE DARK AGES series – Arthur Dux Bellorum. The launch date for this novel is set for 1st March 2019 (if I get it finished!).

I can now reveal the book cover designed by Cathy Walker from an original picture by artist Gordon Napier (all permissions obtained).

Arthur Dux Bellorum is my telling of the King Arthur story, adhering to the style and aims of the previous three books in the series – to present a possible history of Britain’s missing years following the end of Roman occupation in 410 AD, based around scraps of researched information and supplemented with a huge dollop of imagination.

Coming out in March 2019!

Born in Gibraltar and raised on a yacht around the coasts of the Atlantic, JC Steel is an author, martial artist, and introvert… “In between the necessary making of money to allow the writing of more books, I can usually be found stowing away on a spaceship, halfway to the further galaxy.

Science-fiction and urban fantasy are my favourite genres to write in. I grew up on a rich diet of Anne McCaffrey, Tolkien, Dorothy Dunnett, and Jack Higgins, and finally started to write my own books aged fourteen. I can’t point the finger at any one book or author that set me in my current direction, but I blame my tendency to write characters who favour drastically practical solutions on some mix of those. If I can toss in a bit of gender- and genre-bending, so much the better. Status quo is boring.”

Death is for the Living

…when ‘here be monsters’ doesn’t only mark the unknown.

By day, Cristina Batista is a deck girl on a Caribbean charter yacht, with all the sun, smiles, and steel drum music that entails. By night, she and her crew hunt the monsters that prey in the dark: the powerful vampire clans of the New World.

Unfortunately Cristina’s past is hunting her in turn – and it’s catching up. Without her partner, sometime pirate, sometime lordling, and ex-vampire, Jean Vignaud, Cristina wouldn’t simply be dead. She’d be something she fears far more.

Cristina and Jean are experienced, motivated, and resourceful. One faction wants them despite it. The other wants them because of it.

Death is for the Living was released on 26-December-2018

Yes, pirates, vampires, vampire hunters and storms at sea can exist within the pages of one book — and they do it so well in Death is for the Living. It’s most highly recommended.” ~Readers’ Favorite 5 star review by Jack Magnus

I wanted to be mad at the author for the ending; how could they do this! But it was perfect! It ended the way the whole book was written, with mystique.” ~Readers’ Favorite 5 star review by Peggy Jo Wipf

Links to – Author and characters:

Buy the book:

The first of our TWO new year poets is Andrew Green. Andrew recently retired after a career in Local Government, most recently with Slough and RBWM. The 66-year-old poet said when asked about his suitability to be the next Poet Laureate: “I won’t be too disappointed if they go for someone else. My poems are more for fun than to be taken seriously; affectionate but slightly irreverent.”

Begging Your Pardon is a light hearted look at what it’s like to live as a close neighbour of the royals in an imagined Windsor where locals regularly rub shoulders with the royals. It would make an ideal stocking filler for locals with a sense of humour.

Andrew has been writing for a while and won local competition for a poem about Slough that was broadcast on local radio and BBC radio four. He has begun to write more regularly two to three years ago and has built a following on Wattpad where two of his collections were featured and have amassed over 100,000 reads between them. His first published book was Margaret’s Story, a verse biography about his mother published earlier this year.

Andrew Green’s new book, Begging Your Pardon – Please Can I Be Laureate? is a humorous collection of royal poems pushing the merits of a local Laureate who could pop round to the Castle with a poem whenever the occasion demands it. The current Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy will shortly be standing down at the end of her ten-year stint a new Laureate is to be appointed from May 2019. Some well known poets have made clear they don’t wish to be considered, and have even suggested that the post should be abolished, but Andrew is available and willing and would aim to bring a lighter touch to the role. So why don’t they look past all the established poets who make such a fuss about it all and appoint a local poet as the next Poet Laureate?

Andrew has thrown his hat into the ring with a collection of light hearted royal and local poems first shared on Wattpad. He ‘doesn’t do pentameter’ is ‘really just an amateur’ but there should be something here to make you smile.

There is a, sadly one sided, correspondence with Her Majesty, his neighbour from up the hill, fanciful accounts of royal life such as what happens when they forget to take the flag down and encounters, one of them real, with the family themselves. There’s a poem in praise of our patron saint, Saint George, a bit of Brexit naughtiness, some fairy tale princes and princesses, some verses about the wedding and the obligatory royal wedding poem.

Book Buy Link

A poem from the book, Dear Queen Elizabeth expresses why Andrew thinks he would be ideal for the role.

Dear Queen Elizabeth

Just a note to say

Dear Queen Elizabeth,

When next you need a Laureate,

Please consider me.

I write a lot of poetry

So how hard can it be?

In terms of productivity

You could do worse than me.

I’d mark the big occasions

And mark each special day.

Be it births, or deaths,

Or marriages; the special jubilees.

Providing something rhymes with it

You’ll be OK with me.

The better poets turn it down

Get up themselves and sniffy.

I’ll just get on and churn stuff out.

I write most every day.

Whatever you want a poem about.

Please just give me a shout.

I can easily write at Royal request

And churn another out.

I’m very, very local

I just live down the road

I could pop round to the castle

Whenever you’re next home.

Could do a proper interview

Or just come for a brew

I’m flexible so any time

Whatever works for you.


Our second new year poet is the talented stand-and-deliver Pete Cox.

“Hello, I’m Pete Cox, I have been writing for 5 years and performing spoken word for 2. I’m from Slough, England where i host an open mic night called The Innerverse. I write based on experiences, annoyances and anything and everything. I love writing and sharing it. I find freedom in it. I found even more once pushed to perform. I am writing a poem a day for a year. I had worried what I would do with with my mind, thoughts and pain poetry has been the key to freedom. I love the many different styles from each poet I hear. I believe everyone has poetry in them, it just get lost in what people believe poetry should be. I have a YouTube channel and am in the process of creating a website. You can find me here on the social media link until then.

My 2018 thank you note ❤️

…………………………………….

2018 I want to thank you for the gifts you did bring

Firstly thanks for letting me live in the living ring

You began by gifting me foreign lands

Where I felt the break in my hurried plans

So you carried me with your many helping hands

Felt the strain of creative fears

You replaced them with listening ears

I couldn’t walk

So you gave me stages

I lost friends to fair weather flyers

So you gave me storm survivors

When I felt wrong

You said it was alright

That others have the same plight

So we opened mics

When the whereabouts of a venue got me thinking?

You sent in The Herschels King

When feelings dropped me into the submerged

You opened up The Innerverse

When my body wouldn’t function

We crossed to Jones junction

and floated words for general consumption

When I felt love had forgot me not

You showed me my brother tying the knot

When I felt useless and absurd

You gifted me Music And Words

When I danced around the edge

You sent me No-Ledge

When I saw no way through each day

You gave me a group of brothers

with words to play

When my tailor couldn’t fit my suit

Turkish delight filled my boots

When we spoke about my body issues

You gave me an artist who loves tattoos

When I needed a vehicle

From Parris with love took care of it all

When I was unsteady to climb

You gave me Jamie’s guideline

When I thought sports time had gone

You put the ping in my pong

When I felt a rumble in the stomach business

You sent me a hairdresser who fed me crickets

When I lacked vitamin D

You gave me the hottest summer in history

When I felt lonely

You sent me a lullaby who sang me poetry

When my brain needed to be stretched

You gave me lessons in chess

When I didn’t know what was going on

You sponsored me towards comicon

When I dreamt within a dream

You gave 365 days that where lived clean

When I felt the well of grief

You gave me the diving board

and I came back

with more coins to keep

When fear wouldn’t let me go on 2 wheels

You sent me a South African

who knows how it feels

I never went hungry

You always gave me meals

So 2018 thanks for the sweet feels

You gave me great cards during blind deals

You the people

The year is you

The cards in the deck

The hands I’ve not reached yet

You got me through

Each and everyone of you

I couldn’t be me without all of you

So 2018 I adore you

Newsletter – December 2018

AUTHOR NEWS…
Tim is currently writing the fourth book in his A LIGHT IN THE DARK AGES series – Arthur Dux Bellorum. The launch date for this novel is set for 1st March 2019. In January the book cover designed by Cathy Walker will be revealed.

Sparkly Badgers’ Christmas Anthology
Tim is a member of an eclectic Facebook Group of talented independent authors called ‘Sparkly Badgers‘. The group has flexed its creative muscle and produced an anthology of Christmas themed short stories to raise money for Avon Riding Centre for the Disabled. Download the e-book for a feel good glow that will carry you through the festive season…

A BADGER CHRISTMAS CAROL
C H Clepitt and Claire Buss bring you a modern retelling of a classic story, with badgers
CHRISTMAS UNDERWATER
Ever wondered if Santa could make it to mermaids? Wonder no more with this short story from Ted Akin
INVISIBLE CHRISTMAS
A poem from playwright, dramaturge and disability activist Amy Bethan Evans
MRS. CLAUS’S HOLIDAY
Sometimes even Mrs. Claus gets overwhelmed, but how will Santa manage Christmas without her? A sweet short story from Ann Frowd
WISHIN’ YOU WERE HERE BY ME
Will Lindsey and Claire get their happy ever after when Lindsey runs out on their wedding? From author A.M. Leibowitz comes a wonderfully romantic and quirky short story
MIDNIGHT LASAGNE
Some of the best conversations happen at midnight, over lasagne! A gentle short story from Maria Riegger
CHRISTMAS EVE, DESPONDENT
A poem from poet and novelist Joanne Van Leerdam
UNIDENTIFIED FLYING REINDEER
Staying awake to meet Santa doesn’t always go as planned in this quirky short from Lyra Shanti
SANTABOT!
How on Earth can Santa get around all of the houses in just one night? Layla Pinkett has a decidedly Sci-Fi theory
JOEY THE LITTLE CHRISTMAS TREE
Discover Christmas from the viewpoint of the tree in this unusual short from Margena Holmes
ZOË QUINN AND THE BEST CHRISTMAS EVER
Spend Christmas with Zoe Quinn, as she learns that there is a lot more to it than just presents in this short story from Sophie Kearing
THE VISIT
Horror author Chloe Hammond weaves a spine-tingler of a tale with a twist at the end that you will not see coming
A CHRISTMAS TAIL
Writing partnership Jane Jago and E.M. Swift-Hook bring a cute story in verse about a girl discovering the meaning of Christmas with the help of a mouse.
BUY IT HERE


This month’s guest author is… JENNIFER ASH (aka Jenny Kane) who’s here to tell us about her fabulous new historical novel that’s out from the 3rd December…

Edward’s Outlaw: Book Three of The Folville Chronicles

Blurb: January 1330: England is awash with corruption. King Edward III has finally claimed the crown from his scheming mother, Queen Isabella, and is determined to clean up his kingdom.
Encouraged by his new wife, Philippa of Hainault, and her special advisor ‑ a man who knows the noble felons of England very well ‑ King Edward sends word to Roger Wennesley of Leicestershire, with orders to arrest the notorious Folville brothers… including the newly married Robert de Folville.
Robert takes his wife, Mathilda, to Rockingham Castle for her own safety, but no sooner has he left than a maid is found murdered. The dead girl looks a lot like Mathilda. Was the maid really the target ‑ or is Mathilda’s life in danger?
Asked to investigate by the county sheriff in exchange for him slowing the hunt for her husband, Mathilda soon uncovers far more than murder… including a web of deception which trails from London, to Derbyshire, and beyond…
The third thrilling instalment in Jennifer Ash’s The Folville Chronicles series.

Extract
The sound of a fist hammering at the door to the bedchamber broke through Mathilda’s contented slumber. Slower to react than her husband of just three days, she blinked the sleep from her eyes as Robert de Folville leapt from their bed. Wrapping a cloak around his naked frame, he responded to the urgency of the rapping by flinging the door wide open.
‘Adam, whatever’s wrong?’
Clutching the bedclothes to her chest, Mathilda tried to hear what was so pressing that their steward had had to wake them so unceremoniously. The draught, which shot with cruel enthusiasm through the open doorway of the manor house’s second-best bedchamber, made the new Lady Folville shiver, but not as much as her suspicion that something was wrong.
One look at Robert’s expression as he turned from the door confirmed Mathilda’s fears. ‘Something’s happened.’
Instead of elaborating, he threw open the clothes chest in the corner of the room and began piling garments onto the bed. ‘There is a linen roll under the bed; could you fetch it?’
Recognising the determined set of her husband’s face, Matilda hooked a layer of bed linen around her shoulders and dragged a bundle of bound material from beneath the bed. ‘You’re packing?’
‘We’re packing.’ Robert stopped moving as fast as he’d started and beckoned her to his side. ‘I’m so sorry, Mathilda. This isn’t the start to married life I’d imagined for us.’
Engulfed in his arms, relishing the closeness of his flesh, Mathilda concentrated on remaining calm. ‘What do you mean?’
‘We have to go away for a while.’
He stroked a hand through her wavy hair, teasing out the stubborn red tangles that had formed overnight. Even through the tenderness of the gesture, Mathilda could feel the tension rising in him. ‘Away?’
‘I’ll explain while we pack.’ Robert produced another roll from beneath the bed. ‘Separately.’
Determined not to neither shout nor give in to the tears that unhelpfully threatened to escape from the corner of her eyes, Mathilda spoke firmly. ‘Husband, the road to our marriage was not a smooth one. Are you telling me that, only three days after our wedding, we have to part?’
Robert’s eyes flashed with both regret and devilment. ‘Wife, you married into a family of felons. You didn’t expect we were going to live here happily ever after, did you?’

Buy Link US
Buy Link UK

Brief Bio
With a background in history and archaeology, Jennifer Ash should really be sat in a dusty university library translating Medieval Latin criminal records, and writing research documents that hardly anyone would want to read. Instead, tucked away in the South West of England, Jennifer writes stories of medieval crime, steeped in mystery, with a side order of romance.
Influenced by a lifelong love of Robin Hood and medieval ballad literature, Jennifer has written The Outlaw’s Ransom (Book One of The Folville Chronicles) – a short novel, which first saw the light of day within the novel Romancing Robin Hood (written under the name Jenny Kane; Pub. Littwitz Press, 2018).
Book Two of The Folville Chronicles – The Winter Outlaw – was released in April 2018. (pub. LittwitzPress)
Book Three of The Folville Chronicles – Edward’s Outlaw- was released in December 2018.
Jennifer also writes as Jenny Kane. Her work includes the contemporary women’s fiction and romance novels, Romancing Robin Hood (2^nd edition, Littwitz Press, 2018), Abi’s Neighbour (Accent Press, 2017), Another Glass of Champagne (Accent Press, 2016), and the bestsellers, Abi’s House (Accent Press, June 2015), and Another Cup of Coffee (Accent Press, 2013).
All of Jennifer and Jenny Kane’s news can be found at
@JenAshHistory
@JennyKaneAuthor
Jennifer Ash Facebook 
Jenny Kane Website 

Newsletter – November 2018

OK, I’ve changed my mind. I admit it. In March I published book three in my historical series, A Light in the Dark AgesUther’s Destiny – with the announcement that me work was complete. The series was finished. I had intended to join the end of Roman Britannia to the coming of King Arthur. Uther’s Destiny ends with the boy Artorius drawing the sword from the stone in a cunning plan devised by Merlyn.
Well, seven months on, I’ve decided to continue the series and write a fourth book. I had initially baulked at the prospect of writing a King Arthur story (oh no, not another one!) but, having mulled it over and done some further reading around the subject, have found a way in – a glimmer of a storyline. So, I’m heading in – wish me luck! I’ve also decided to follow the same plotting and writing plan that led to Uther’s Destiny last year. This involved researching, writing a plot outline, character lists and a first half chapter plan in October, and then crashing out a first draft (or at least the first 50,000 words) in November, using the framework of National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo).
My novel title is: Arthur Dux Bellorum and I’ve even found a picture I’d like to use for the cover. I found this on a site called DeviantArt and tracked down its owner. I have agreed a fee with him to use it for commercial purposes, and have sent it to my cover designer, Cathy Walker, to see what she can do with it. Here’s the picture…

NaNoWriMo – www.nanowrimo.org
National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) is a fun, seat-of-your-pants approach to creative writing. On November 1, about 400,000 participants from all over the World began working towards the goal of writing a 50,000-word novel by 11:59 PM on November 30. November is a bit of a nothing month – wedged between the end of summer and the start of the madness of Christmas – so perfect for putting aside the 2-3 hours a day that is required to maintaining an average of 1,666 words a day to hit the 50,000-word target (evenings and weekends take most of strain).
Valuing enthusiasm, determination, and a deadline, NaNoWriMo is for anyone who has ever thought about writing a novel. Mr. NaNo says: “Our experiences since 1999 show that 50,000 words is a challenging but achievable goal, even for people with full-time jobs and children. This is about the length of The Great Gatsby. We don’t use the word “novella” because it doesn’t seem to impress people the way “novel” does. We define a novel as “a lengthy work of fiction.” Beyond that, we let you decide whether what you’re writing falls under the heading of “novel.” In short: If you believe you’re writing a novel, we believe you’re writing a novel, too.”

Pep Talk From Neil Gaiman

From the NaNo Archives, I’ve found this inspirational Pep Talk from bestselling author, Neil Gaiman…
Dear NaNoWriMo Author,
By now you’re probably ready to give up. You’re past that first fine furious rapture when every character and idea is new and entertaining. You’re not yet at the momentous downhill slide to the end, when words and images tumble out of your head sometimes faster than you can get them down on paper. You’re in the middle, a little past the half-way point. The glamour has faded, the magic has gone, your back hurts from all the typing, your family, friends and random email acquaintances have gone from being encouraging or at least accepting to now complaining that they never see you any more—and that even when they do you’re preoccupied and no fun. You don’t know why you started your novel, you no longer remember why you imagined that anyone would want to read it, and you’re pretty sure that even if you finish it it won’t have been worth the time or energy and every time you stop long enough to compare it to the thing that you had in your head when you began—a glittering, brilliant, wonderful novel, in which every word spits fire and burns, a book as good or better than the best book you ever read—it falls so painfully short that you’re pretty sure that it would be a mercy simply to delete the whole thing.
Welcome to the club.
That’s how novels get written.
You write. That’s the hard bit that nobody sees. You write on the good days and you write on the lousy days. Like a shark, you have to keep moving forward or you die. Writing may or may not be your salvation; it might or might not be your destiny. But that does not matter. What matters right now are the words, one after another. Find the next word. Write it down. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat.
A dry-stone wall is a lovely thing when you see it bordering a field in the middle of nowhere but becomes more impressive when you realise that it was built without mortar, that the builder needed to choose each interlocking stone and fit it in. Writing is like building a wall. It’s a continual search for the word that will fit in the text, in your mind, on the page. Plot and character and metaphor and style, all these become secondary to the words. The wall-builder erects her wall one rock at a time until she reaches the far end of the field. If she doesn’t build it it won’t be there. So she looks down at her pile of rocks, picks the one that looks like it will best suit her purpose, and puts it in.
The search for the word gets no easier but nobody else is going to write your novel for you.
The last novel I wrote (it was ANANSI BOYS, in case you were wondering) when I got three-quarters of the way through I called my agent. I told her how stupid I felt writing something no-one would ever want to read, how thin the characters were, how pointless the plot. I strongly suggested that I was ready to abandon this book and write something else instead, or perhaps I could abandon the book and take up a new life as a landscape gardener, bank-robber, short-order cook or marine biologist. And instead of sympathising or agreeing with me, or blasting me forward with a wave of enthusiasm—or even arguing with me—she simply said, suspiciously cheerfully, “Oh, you’re at that part of the book, are you?”
I was shocked. “You mean I’ve done this before?”
“You don’t remember?”
“Not really.”
“Oh yes,” she said. “You do this every time you write a novel. But so do all my other clients.”
I didn’t even get to feel unique in my despair.
So, I put down the phone and drove down to the coffee house in which I was writing the book, filled my pen and carried on writing.
One word after another.
That’s the only way that novels get written and, short of elves coming in the night and turning your jumbled notes into Chapter Nine, it’s the only way to do it.
So keep on keeping on. Write another word and then another.
Pretty soon you’ll be on the downward slide, and it’s not impossible that soon you’ll be at the end. Good luck…
Neil Gaiman

Newsletter – September 2018

This month my guest author is the fabulous and talented Mary Anne Yarde. She has a new book out in her Arthurian legend series, The Du Lac Chronicles. I have enjoyed reading this series and look forward to reading the fourth book, The Du Lac Prophecy.
More on that later. First, let me briefly bring you up to date with what’s happening in my creative writing world…

NEW BOOK OUT SOON – CHARLY & THE SUPERHEROES
Following on from The Adventures of Charly Holmes (2016), my daughter Cathy and I have written a new adventure, which we intend to launch on (or close to) 19th September.
The ideas came from Cathy, who’s new love is Superheroes movies. “Hey, Dad, why don’t we write a story where Charly goes on a studio tour in Hollywood and gets asked to take the place of a child actor who is sick in a new superheroes movie?!!”
So, we kicked the idea around during our summer holidays and came up with – Charly & The Superheroes.
We found an illustrator with cartoon experience through www.upwork.com and put up a proposal with a crude sketch showing the concept. The illustrator made the drawing and designed the cover, matching as closely as possible the fonts and style of the first book cover. We’re quite happy with the results… what do you think?

This month’s guest author is…
Mary Anne Yarde the multi award-winning author of the International Bestselling series — The Du Lac Chronicles.

Mary grew up in the southwest of England, surrounded and influenced by centuries of history and mythology. Glastonbury — the fabled Isle of Avalon — was a mere fifteen-minute drive from her home, and tales of King Arthur and his knights were a part of her childhood.

1. Hi Mary and thanks for guesting on my blog. Firstly, can you tell us a little about the Du Lac Chronicles?

For well over a thousand years we have been enchanted with the tales of King Arthur and his Knights. Arthur’s story has everything – loyalty, betrayal, love, hate, war and peace, and like all good stories, there isn’t a happy ending for our hero. Arthur is betrayed by his best friend, Lancelot, and then he is betrayed once again by his nephew, Mordred. Arthur’s reign comes to a dramatic and tragic end on the battlefield at Camlann.

When Arthur died, the Knights died with him. Without their leader they were nothing, and they disappeared from history. No more is said of them, and I always wondered why not. Just because Arthur is dead, that doesn’t mean that his Knights didn’t carry on living. Their story must continue — if only someone would tell it!

The Du Lac Chronicles is a sweeping saga that follows the fortunes and misfortunes of Lancelot du Lac’s sons as they try to forge a life for themselves in an ever-changing Saxon world. In each book, you will meet the same characters, whom hopefully readers have come to love. I made sure that each book stands alone, but as with all series, it is best to start at the beginning.

2. What inspired you to write The Du Lac Chronicles?

I grew up surrounded by the rolling Mendip Hills in Somerset — the famous town of Glastonbury was a mere 15 minutes from my childhood home. Glastonbury is a little bit unique in the sense that it screams Arthurian Legend. Even the road sign that welcomes you into Glastonbury says…

“Welcome to Glastonbury. The Ancient Isle of Avalon.”

How could I grow up in such a place and not be influenced by King Arthur?

I loved the stories of King Arthur and his Knights as a child, but I always felt let down by the ending. For those not familiar, there is a big battle at a place called Camlann. Arthur is fatally wounded. He is taken to Avalon. His famous sword is thrown back into the lake. Arthur dies. His Knights, if they are not already dead, become hermits. The end.

What an abrupt and unsatisfactory ending to such a wonderful story. I did not buy that ending. So my series came about not only because of my love for everything Arthurian, but also because I wanted to write an alternative ending. I wanted to explore what happened after Arthur’s death.

3. What were the challenges you faced in researching this period of history?

Researching the life and times of King Arthur is incredibly challenging. Trying to find the historical Arthur is like looking for a needle in a haystack. An impossible task. But one thing where Arthur is prevalent, and you are sure to find him, is in folklore.

Folklore isn’t an exact science. It evolves. It is constantly changing. It is added to. Digging up folklore, I found, is not the same as extracting relics! However, I think that is why I find it so appealing.

The Du Lac Chronicles is set in Dark Age, Britain, Brittany and France, so I really needed to understand as much as I could about the era that my books are set in. Researching such a time brings about its own set of challenges. There is a lack of reliable primary written sources. Of course, there are the works of Gildas, Nennius and Bede as well as The Annals of Wales, which we can turn to, but again, they are not what I would consider reliable sources. Even the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, which was compiled in the late 9th Century, has to be treated with caution. So it is down to archaeologists to fill in the missing blanks, but they can only do so much. Which means in some instances, particularly with regards to the history of Brittany during this time, I have no choice but to take an educated guess as to what it was like.

4. There are many books about King Arthur. Can you tell us three things that set your novels apart?

You are quite right; there are many fabulous books about King Arthur and his Knights. So what sets my books apart:

1.) My books are set after the death of King Arthur.
2.) Not all the Knights are heroic, and some of them are not even Christians. Ahh!
3.) You will meet some “historical” characters from the past — not all of them are legendary!

5. Do you have a favourite Arthurian character from history?

I really should say Lancelot du Lac, as my books are based on his story. But in truth, one of my favourite characters is Sir Gawain. Gawain And The Green Knight is one of my all-time favourite Arthurian stories.

6. What next?
I am currently working on Book 5 of The Du Lac Chronicles.

The Du Lac Prophecy
(Book 4 of The Du Lac Chronicles)
By Mary Anne Yarde

Two Prophesies. Two Noble Households. One Throne.

Distrust and greed threaten to destroy the House of du Lac. Mordred Pendragon strengthens his hold on Brittany and the surrounding kingdoms while Alan, Mordred’s cousin, embarks on a desperate quest to find Arthur’s lost knights. Without the knights and the relics they hold in trust, they cannot defeat Arthur’s only son – but finding the knights is only half of the battle. Convincing them to fight on the side of the Du Lac’s, their sworn enemy, will not be easy.

If Alden, King of Cerniw, cannot bring unity there will be no need for Arthur’s knights. With Budic threatening to invade Alden’s Kingdom, Merton putting love before duty, and Garren disappearing to goodness knows where, what hope does Alden have? If Alden cannot get his House in order, Mordred will destroy them all.

Excerpt:
“I feared you were a dream,” Amandine whispered, her voice filled with wonder as she raised her hand to touch the soft bristles and the raised scars on his face. “I was afraid to open my eyes. But you really are real,” she laughed softly in disbelief. She touched a lock of his flaming red hair and pushed it back behind his ear. “Last night…” she studied his face intently for several seconds as if looking for something. “I am sorry if I hurt you. I didn’t know who you were, and I didn’t know where I was. I was scared.”

“You certainly gave me a walloping,” he grinned gently down at her, his grey eyes alight with humour. “I think you have the makings of a great mercenary. I might have to recruit you to my cause.”

She smiled at his teasing, but then she began to trace the scars on his face with the tips of her fingers, and her smile disappeared. “Do they still hurt?”

“Yes,” Merton replied. “But the pain I felt when I thought you were dead was a hundred times worse. Philippe had broken my body, but that was nothing compared to the pain in my heart. Without you, I was lost.”

“That day… When they beat you. You were so brave,” Amandine replied.
Her fingers felt like butterflies on his skin, so soft and gentle. He closed his eyes to savour the sensation.

“I never knew anyone could be that brave,” Amandine continued. “You could have won your freedom and yet, you surrendered to their torture to save me. Why? I am but one person. Just one amongst so many.”

“Why do you think?” Merton asked shakily, opening his eyes to look at her again, hoping she could see the depth of his love in his scarred and deformed face.

“I gave you these scars,” Amandine stated with a painful realisation, her hand dropping away from his face. “You are like this because of me,” her voice was thick with unshed tears.

“No, not because of you,” Merton immediately contradicted. “My reputation, Philippe’s greed, Mordred’s hate, and Bastian’s fear, gave me these scars—”

“I should not have gone back to your chamber. If they had not found me there, then they would never have known about us. If they had not known, then you would have had no cause to surrender. Bastian would not have taken your sword arm.” Amandine touched what was left of his arm. “Philippe would not have lashed you.” She touched his face again and shook her head. “I am to blame.” She sat up and her eyes filled with tears, her hand fell away from his face. “I am to blame,” she said again as a tear slipped down her cheek. “How can you stand to be near me?”

Buy Links:

Amazon US

Amazon UK

Amazon CA

Media Links:
Website/Blog: https://maryanneyarde.blogspot.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/maryanneyarde/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/maryanneyarde
Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/Mary-Anne-Yarde/e/B01C1WFATA/
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15018472.Mary_Anne_Yarde

Newsletter – August 2018

Welcome to Tim Walker’s monthly newsletter covering all things books – news, reviews, guest authors and poets. No guests this month as Tim is on holiday.

The third and final book in A Light in the Dark Ages series, Uther’s Destiny, was published In March 2018. I then returned to book one, Abandoned, and extensively revised and extended it, re-launching in July 2018 as a second edition. I can now kick-back and enjoy summer knowing that the series is finally complete.

SUMMER READING LIST

I’m enjoying a summer break with my teenaged daughter (and co-author), Cathy,  and visiting my parents in my annual time for rest and reflection. If you’re looking for an e-book or paperback to read this summer, why not try one of these?

ABANDONED

I have recently uploaded a revised and extended version of book one in my historical series, A Light in the Dark Ages. It’s in desperate need of new reviews on Amazon, hence the low e-book price of just 99p/99c for the summer (Paperback £5.99/$6.99).

Shortly after the last Roman administrators and soldiers abandoned their province of Britannia, Bishop Guithelin, guided by visions from God, embarked on a perilous journey to a foreign land to seek assistance for his ailing country. From this mission an adventure unfolds that pits a noble prince and his followers against tribal chiefs who see no need for a leader – and ruthless Saxon invaders who spill onto the coast in search of plunder.
Heroes emerge, including half-Roman auxiliary commander, Marcus Pendragon, who looks to protect his family by organising the defence of the town of Calleva from a menacing Saxon army, who are carving out a trail of murder and destruction across the south coast. Through the turmoil, Britannia’s first king in the post-Roman period emerges – Constantine – who takes on the difficult task of repelling invaders and dealing with troublesome rebels, until…

Abandoned is book one in a three-book series, A Light in the Dark Ages, that charts the story of the Pendragon family, building to the eventual coming of their most famous son – King Arthur. There is a black hole in British history, known as The Dark Ages. What happened to the Britons after the Romans departed around the year 410, never to return? There are few surviving records and therefore much speculation. Whilst some Britons may have viewed this as liberation, others would no doubt have felt a sense of trepidation once the military protection of the legions was removed. Abandoned speculates on the anxieties of some and opportunism of others, as Fifth Century Britannia slowly adjusted to self-rule.

POSTCARDS FROM LONDON
Prefer reading engaging and humorous short stories whilst reclining on a lounger? The city of London is the star of this collection of 15 short stories that reflect the past, mirror the present and imagine the future of this incredible city of over 8 million souls. The Romans were the first men of vision who helped shape the city we see today. Turn over these picture postcards to explore the author’s city through a collage of human dramas told in a range of genres.
e-book is £1.99/$2.99 and the paperback £4.99/$5.99.

DEVIL GATE DAWN
Worried about Brexit? Then get comfortable with this humorous, dystopian thriller, set in post-Brexit Britain and crazy Trump America in the year 2026. Affable retired railwayman, George Osborne, is planning his retirement when his pub is blown apart in a terrorist bombing. Understandably angry at the untimely death of his close friend, he forms a vigilante group to track down those responsible. Against a backdrop of civil unrest and under the quixotic rule of King Charles III and his Privy Council, George must somehow protect his family whilst he is unwittingly being drawn into the hunt for kidnapped King Charles that ultimately leads to a showdown at Devil Gate Dawn.
e-book £1.99/$2.99 and paperback £5.99/$6.99 http://myBook.to/DevilGateDawn

Newsletter – July 2018

This is the newsletter of British author Tim Walker. It aims to be monthly and typically includes: book news and offers, guest author profiles, book reviews, flash fiction and poetry.
Readers of this newsletter are invited to bid for the guest author slot, submit a book review, flash fiction story (up to 250 words) or poem… contact@timwalkerwrites.co.uk

AUTHOR’S NEWS – ABANDONED REVISED AND EXTENDED NEW EDITION

I’ve just re-published a new, longer second edition of Abandoned, book one in A Light in the Dark Ages series. It addresses the complaints at the brevity of the original novella that told the story of Marcus and the defence of Calleva.

This is now incorporated into a longer story that charts Britannia’s troubled journey from abandonment by the Romans to choosing a king to organise their defence from determined raiders. The narrative thrust is loosely guided by the writings of Geoffrey of Monmouth in his 1136 work, The History of the Kings of Britain.

The romantic in me likes to think there might be some credence in his account of events in fifth century Britannia leading up to the coming of King Arthur (now widely thought to be a composite of a number of leaders who organised opposition to the spread of Anglo-Saxon colonists).
I’m holding the e-book price at just 99p/99c – so please help me replace the lost reviews from the now unpublished first edition. Much work has gone into this upgrade from novella to novel – I hope you enjoy it!

I can now say, after three years, the series is FINALLY COMPLETE!

ABANDONED

AMBROSIUS: LAST OF THE ROMANS

UTHER’S DESTINY

This month my two guests, Jonathan Posner and Sarah Ann Hall, are, like myself, members of the Windsor Writers’ Group.
The group of about 12 writers’ meet once a month at The Hope Pub (in the Library), on Alma Road, Windsor.
The group was formed in 2014 and has published a book of short stories – Windsor Tales

If you’d like to join or visit us (to give an author talk?) then please drop us an email: windsor.writers@gmail.com
WEBSITE
FACEBOOK

Jonathan Posner Author Profile
Jonathan has been an avid reader of fiction ever since he was old enough to own a torch. As a schoolboy he virtually lived in Narnia, and as he got older, he discovered historical fiction – particularly Phillipa Gregory, Susan Kay, C J Sansom and the Flashman Papers.

He loves creative writing, and has written Book and Lyrics for three full-scale Musicals, all of which have been performed locally. There have also been two plays, some poetry and several short stories. And now he has upcycled the plot of one of the Musicals into The Witchfinder’s Well, a full-length fantasy historical fiction novel.

The short stories have also been published as Once Upon an Ending
Currently he is close to completing the first draft of the sequel to The Witchfinder’s Well, to be called The Alchemist’s Arms. Jonathan is married with two sons and lives near London, UK.

The Witchfinder’s Well book blurb:
“Bringing the Tudors to life! … an engrossing thriller with plenty of twists and turns.”

Tudor England – a dangerous world where a few wrong words can get you accused of witchcraft and burned at the stake.

So when a freak electrical storm sends modern-day girl Justine Parker time-travelling back to 1565, she quickly becomes the target of sinister witchfinder Matthew Hopkirk.

Justine must use all her cunning and ingenuity to keep one step ahead of Hopkirk. But not only must she save herself, she also has to save her new love, Sir William de Beauvais, from the early death she knows history has decreed for him.

Can Justine save herself from Hopkirk? And what if she saves Sir William from one fate, only to pitch him into another, even more deadly?

The Witchfinder’s Well gives a refreshing and new take on Tudor history, and is a must for fans of Philippa Gregory, C.J. Sansom and Judith Arnopp.

Extract:
As she surveyed the royal banquet from her high vantage point in the Minstrel’s Gallery, Justine Parker twisted slightly to get more comfortable in the tight bodice of her gown.
All things considered, it was going pretty well.
An army of servants had brought exotic dishes up from the kitchens into the Great Hall and presented them to the assembled ladies, gentlemen, knights and courtiers for their appreciation and amazement.
There were dishes such as the noble roast peacock with its plumage dancing in the light, guinea fowl in a deep crusty pie and legs of mutton surrounded by mountains of peas and carrots. Fine red claret was drunk copiously from silver goblets, with the servants replenishing them from silver pitchers as they weaved around the tables.
Justine leaned on the railing of the gallery and let the warm sound of conversation and laughter wash over her; the rich hubbub of noise that rose up to the furthest corners of the magnificent ornate plaster roof. Down below her, the face of every guest was bright with enjoyment, bathed in the golden glow of a thousand flickering candles.
In the middle of the high table, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth sat bolt upright, her bright eyes dancing round the room as the courtier to her right engaged her in conversation.
Justine admired her pale beauty, set off by her striking bodice of red velvet edged with gold lace and sparkling with a thousand shimmering pearls, together with the single flashing emerald at her neck that brought out the green fire in her eyes. Then there was her red-bronze hair adorned with its simple, elegant gold crown, framed by the high pearl-edged lace ruff that flared up from her shoulders.
With a small raise of her hand, the Queen paused the conversation with the courtier beside her and looked up at the gallery. Maybe Justine’s small twisting movement had caught her eye. She held Justine’s gaze a moment, then gave the smallest nod of her head – so small that it could easily have been missed – as if to congratulate Justine on the success of the banquet she had organised.
With a smile Justine bowed her own head and gave a gentle curtsey. The Queen nodded again, then turned back to the courtier and resumed their conversation.
In the gallery Justine smiled again, this time to herself.
Yes, all things considered, the banquet was going pretty well.
She looked down across the room, taking in the full scene. The long high table ran along the back wall under the big windows with the Queen in the centre. On either side Justine had seated her most important courtiers, looking resplendent in their richly-coloured silk doublets with slashed sleeves and fine white ruffs. Beyond the courtiers she had seated the women, elegant in their low-cut gowns, their hair carefully parted in the centre and tucked under their French hoods – a style introduced originally by Elizabeth’s mother, Anne Boleyn.
Justine’s gaze moved to the table down the left side of the room. The people here were less important and their clothes reflected this – the men wore plain doublets and the women wore their hair in simple cotton coifs rather than the more elaborate French hoods of the high table. Their behaviour was no less exuberant, if anything slightly more so, and Justine smiled as they all laughed at a joke from the jester who had been moving round the tables. His brightly-coloured motley costume consisted of a tunic split into a red half and a yellow half, while his hose had one red leg and one yellow leg on the opposite sides. In his hand was a small jester head on a stick, which he was using to entertain the guests.
From behind her came the sound of the minstrels; four elderly men with lutes playing light-hearted music that was all but lost against the loud noise of the room. Their piece came to an end, and she turned to them.
“You play well, good sirs,” she said with a twinkling smile. “What is next?”
“We have not yet played Greensleeves,” said the eldest minstrel. “But first we need a drink.” All four reached down for the tankards by their stools and drained them with great satisfaction. The oldest man then examined the bottom of his empty tankard and looked up at Justine expectantly. She laughed and reached for the large pewter jug ready by her feet, then went to each in turn, pouring more beer into their proffered tankards.
“Ahh, thank you my girl,” said the oldest man, “it is always a pleasure to play at one of your banquets.”
Justine curtseyed in reply. The men drank some more, then put down their tankards and launched into Greensleeves.
She turned and resumed her gaze across the Great Hall.
To her right was a smaller table seating more people, with a carving table beside it. On the wall above was a large portrait of a handsome knight in a shining breastplate standing with a white stag in the background. Her gaze stopped on this portrait, as it so often did, and she gave a small sigh as she studied the man’s long blond hair and trim beard.
The jester turned from the table he’d been entertaining and looked up, catching sight of Justine as she stared across at the portrait.
His gaze took in her shoulder-length cascade of russet-coloured ringlets trying to escape from under her French hood; her small, slightly snub nose, her pale blue eyes under thick, dark eyebrows staring with a faraway look at the portrait…
He gave a little dance and waved his stick to catch her eye.
She spotted him and gave a small wave back. He raised an enquiring eyebrow, then flicked the stick up behind his back so the little jester head on the end popped up on his shoulder.
He turned to it and appeared to have a brief conversation, then pointed up at her. The little head on his shoulder nodded. He made a ‘doe-eyed’ face – a gross over-exaggeration of hers, with a sickly grin and fluttering eyelashes – then pointed back at her. The head nodded again, then both the jester and the head turned to look up at her, with the jester smiling broadly.
She couldn’t help but laugh and he laughed back. Then he gave a low courtly bow, while she applauded.
The jester turned back to the room and started dancing sideways up towards the high table.
Still chuckling, Justine’s gaze moved upwards to the large tapestries depicting heroic scenes of hunts that were hanging round the hall between the sconces. In one scene knights attacked a stag with spears and arrows in a green forest; in another a different stag was running from a pack of baying hounds, followed by nobles on horses.
Justine looked back down at the hall. The servants had cleared the main courses away and were now circulating with bowls of fruit and more wine.
‘Only an hour more and we’ll be cleared and finished,’ she thought, as she twisted once more in the tight bodice of her gown.
Just then she became aware of an insistent beeping sound over the noise of the room. Fishing her mobile from the pocket of her gown, she swiped the screen.
“Hello, Justine Parker here.”
“The taxis have started arriving,” said a voice. “They’re early.”
“Oh, bother. I put half-eleven on the schedule.” She nudged up the end of her lace sleeve with her elbow, to reveal her watch. “It’s only eleven fifteen. We’ve just served the fruit. Would you be a sweetie and tell them they’ll have to wait?”
“OK.”
“And please can you tell them to turn their meters off. I don’t want one of their silly waiting charges when it’s all their fault.” Justine thought a moment. “It is their fault, isn’t it? Oh bother and blast it, it had better be. I’ll check the email I sent them. Can you be an absolute poppet and bluff it out or something?”
“Sure, no problem.”
Justine tapped the email app on her phone and scrolled through to find the relevant message. There it was – ‘please make sure the taxis arrive at 11:30pm’.
Tucking her mobile back into her pocket with a satisfied smile, Justine looked back down at the hall.

Welcome to Poet’s Corner, Sarah Ann Hall

I have been writing fiction for 20-years, starting with the book I needed to get out of my system, which shall never again see the light of day. During that time I’ve worked as an antiques dealer, jewellery designer-maker, painter and decorator, and written a number of novel-length works that I would be happy to see published. I recently completed a novel about a young woman coming to terms with terminal cancer, for which I am currently seeking agent representation. I also write short stories, some of which have published in anthologies or short-listed in competitions, and flash fiction, which I post on my blog sarahannhall.wordpress.com. I find it difficult to identify my genre, but focus on relationships and the psychological while writing about love, death, and mental health.

I am not a poet but experiment with micropoetry – tanka, shadorma, American Cinquain – and find these concentrate the mind as well as language.

FACEBOOK

TWITTER

Notice.

Look at these scars.

Open your eyes and ears.

Self-harm dulls the pain others cause.

Hear me.

 

kids line up in rows

sit at desks in the classroom

what’s one more or less

when measles contagion hits

or a gunman visits school.

 

And on a lighter note:

She likes jokes,

playing tricks, teasing.

‘Pull my thumb,’

she hisses.

Her prosthetic arm flies off.

She crumples, giggling.

At least fifty pounds

He spread his arms wide and winked

Perfect scales, bright eyes

A competition winner

If it hadn’t swum away.

Newsletter – June 2018

JUNE 2018 NEWSLETTER

This is the newsletter of UK author Tim Walker. It aims to be monthly and typically includes: book news and offers, guest author profiles, book reviews, flash fiction and poetry.
Readers of this newsletter are invited to volunteer for the guest author slot, submit a book review, flash fiction story (up to 250 words) or poem to timwalker1666@gmail.com for future issues.

AUTHOR NEWS

BOOK COVER AWARD NOMINATION FOR UTHER’S DESTINY
Uther’s Destiny, the third book in A Light in the Dark Ages series, continues to attract positive reviews and the cover has been short-listed for the Alternative Read Book Cover Awards… voting is open until end of June so please visit their site and vote for Uther – thanks! VOTE HERE

A LIGHT IN THE DARK AGES:
Book one – Abandoned (http://myBook.to/Abandoned)
Book two – Ambrosius: Last of the Romans (http://myBook.to/Ambrosius)
Book three – Uther’s Destiny (http://myBook.to/Uther)

This month’s guest author is JANE RISDON.

This newsletter has a rock music theme… read on…

Hi Tim, thanks so much for asking me to share some information about Only One Woman with you. As you may know, this is my first foray into Women’s Fiction. I normally write crime/thrillers. So this was an amazing challenge for me, and especially as I’ve never co-written with anyone before. Christina Jones is my co-author, an award-winning, best-selling author in her own right.

Only One Woman was published as an E-book and a Paperback for Kindle in November 2017, and the Paperback and Audio for stores and mass markets was published in May 2018.

Photo taken in Studio City on 12/15/15.

The May paperback edition features a foreword written by Graham Bonnet, former singer with The Marbles – Only One Woman was their hit single in 1968, hence the name of our novel. Only One Woman which was written especially for Graham and his cousin, Trevor Gordon, by the Bee Gees. Graham went on to front the iconic rock outfits, Rainbow (Since You Been Gone), Alcatraz, Michael Schenker, Ritchie Blackmore and others. Graham now fronts his own band, The Graham Bonnet Band and is touring Europe and the UK in August 2018. We are really happy he agreed to write this for us and it tells the story of how his musical career began and also how much he loved reading Only One Woman; lots of guys love it too.

Only One Woman is a love triangle set in the late 1960s and has a musical theme, with the main characters, Renza, Scott – lead guitarist with Narnia’s Children, and Stella. Christina and I share a musical past; she was fan-club secretary to my then boyfriend’s band (now my husband) and so many of the experiences in the book are based – with poetic license – upon the real UK Music Scene in 1968/69, with lots of current events of the day, including the Moon landings, The Cold War and all the social changes happening at the time. There is a lot of music and fashion in the novel and so far guys love it as much as gals. It is much more than a love story.

Here is an extract:

Renza’s Diary
July 20th 1968

     Narnia’s Children, Rich and Stephan were crammed in Bessie, with me sitting on Scott’s knee, for our trip to ‘Tin Pan Alley’. Scott’s arms held me tightly as we lurched along, Bessie was obviously getting too old for all the work she had to do.
We parked near Soho and went into Denmark Street and up some stairs at the side of a music shop into a little cramped room full of people who looked like musicians, all going through sheet music and chatting to the publishers about songs.
The person ‘dealing’ with Narnia’s Children had set aside some sheet music and also some records which he called ‘demonstration recordings’ for them to listen to. Apparently singers recorded songs written by the songwriters to demonstrate to other singers what they sounded like, so they could decide if they wanted to record them or not. However, they said that whoever produced the record in the end would probably change things a lot anyway. It was all very exciting.
We even listened to a song recorded by The Bee Gees, called ‘‘Coalman’, which Stephan wanted Narnia’s Children to record, but no one was keen on it, even though The Bee Gees were apparently considering it for their own long playing record at some point.
Cilla Black was in there, choosing songs, and I thought she didn’t look that special close up. There were a couple of others, who I knew were famous but I couldn’t recall their names, and Scott frowned at me when I asked him who they were. So I shut up. It was still all so new and rather thrilling for me.
After a couple of hours the band had chosen some songs and we left with sheet music and recordings for them to keep of songs they were interested in.

Apparently they were due back in London tomorrow to have talks with some famous songwriters and record producers, so I wouldn’t be seeing Scott again until Sunday, if they weren’t playing.
On the way back we stopped off on the London Road and went inside the Little Chef for Coca Cola and a hamburger. I’d never been inside before or had hamburger and fries. Stephan had a pink milkshake – it was very American.
The band was fascinated when I told them that this Little Chef was the very first ever to be opened in the whole of England. I’m full of these little gems according to Rich.
Scott stayed behind with me when the others went back to their flat and Mum said we could go for a short walk if we wanted. We wanted. We set off on our usual route around the village and mercifully this time none of the kids were stalking us.
The cruise had been great fun and everyone ate and drank too much and partied too hard, Scott said.
‘You’d love it babe, there was so much to do on board and the shops and restaurants were amazing, so cool, so hip,’ he said excitedly, eyes shining. ‘And the people: so much money, so glamorous and sophisticated.’

Jane Risdon – Biography:
Jane Risdon has spent most of her life in the international music business. Married to a musician she has experienced the business first hand, not only as the girlfriend and wife of a musician, but later with her husband as a manager of recording artists, songwriters and record producers, as well as placing songs on TV/Movie soundtracks for some of the most popular series and movies shown around the world.
Writing is something she has always wanted to do but a hectic life on the road and recording with artists kept those ambitions at bay. Now she is writing mostly crime and thrillers, but recently she’s collaborated with award-winning author Christina Jones, on Only One Woman. A story they’ve wanted to write together, ever since they became friends when Christina became Fan-club secretary for Jane’s husband’s band. Only One Woman is published by Accent Press and is available from all good book stores, on Amazon and other digital stores.

Jane Risdon – links:
Jane’s Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B00I3GJ2Y8
Author Blog: https://janerisdon.wordpress.com/
Facebook Author Page: https://www.facebook.com/JaneRisdon2/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/Jane_Risdon
Christina Jones Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ChristinaJonesAuthor
Only One Woman Paperback: ISBN: 9781783757312
Only One Woman Audio: ISBN: 1520037635
Only One Woman e-pub: http://amzn.to/2hrCbE8
Only One Woman Simon & Schuster North America/Canada: ISBN: 9781682994252
Only One Woman Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/RenzandStella/
Graham Bonnet Tour: www.shockcity.co.uk
Graham Bonnet Band: http://www.grahambonnetband.com/

My guest this month is legendary guitarist from Tubeway Army and punk band, Open Sore, SEAN BURKE. Sean lives in Berkshire and continues to writes songs – for examples of his current work follow the Soundcloud link below.

VERTIGO song lyric
As an angry young man back in the day, Sean was a founder member of punk band Open Sore, who famously played at the Roxy in London, amongst other venues including the Marquee. Their iconic song, Vertigo, written by Sean and vocalist, Bob Kyley, was selected for the Farewell to the Roxy live album.
“Ask anyone who has heard the Farewell to The Roxy album or even the bands themselves who played on it who’s was the best song and its odds on that Open Sore’s Vertigo will be the song they all say.” Quote from Punk77 fanzine
I asked Sean why he chose this lyric for my newsletter. He replied, “I wrote this in 1977 about the dangers of living in high-rise tower blocks in London and it all came back to haunt me during the Grenfell Tower tragedy last year. These lyrics suddenly have a fresh vibe.”

VERTIGO
It’s so high what we doing up here?
It’s so high what we doing up here?
It’s so high what we doing up here?
We got vertigo, vertigo, vertigo!

It’s so high

whatcha planning for us down there?
Whatcha planning for us down there?
What you planning for us?
We got vertigo, vertigo, vertigo!

We don’t like the view from this mountain
Everything is so distant to me.
Our legs ache, the lift ain’t working.
Meet me at the bottom and I’ll take you up for tea.

We just hope there isn’t a fire
We won’t stand a chance at the top.
Hellish fire not unlike a pyre.
The ladders wouldn’t reach us
The ladders wouldn’t reach us
The ladders wouldn’t reach us up here.

It’s so high, what we doing up here?
It’s so high, what we doing up here?
It’s so high, what we doing up here?
We got vertigo, vertigo, vertigo!

It’s so high…

YouTube link: https://youtu.be/TeVuZUSmSnw

BLOOD MONEY
“This song was written in 1990 about Sonia Sutcliffe suing Private Eye who on appeal had the original damages awarded reduced by 90%, casting doubt on her testimony that she hadn’t sold her story to the News of the World – I felt strongly about it at the time.”

I don’t owe you blood money
I don’t owe you blood money
Why don’t you sell them a photo
Oh, of yourself.

Then you may reach the papers
And have lots of friends again
Then you may never go out again
Yes, you can have some friends just to stay indoors.

You sit in an angry courtroom
You have no fear.
I don’t believe all the stories I hear
But I think you knew it all.

It must have been hell you
The things they said about your husband
It was true
I think you knew it all.

I don’t owe you blood money
I don’t owe you blood money
It’s a shame when there’s a nightmare
It’s a shame yeah
Where blood money’s concerned.

Why don’t you think of helpless people
Besides yourself?
Like the 20 motherless children
And let them forget it all.

Let their horror die in vain
‘Cause the woman ‘her husband, honey, he was insane’
It’s a shame they know…

Blood’s money
Money’s blood.

Words and music by SEAN BURKE. cc

Soundcloud link: https://soundcloud.com/user-994232412